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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all!
This is my first post! Yay!?

My doberman (Arlo) is 10 months old, overall he's really good but sometimes his barking(whining) for attention is out of control. If I wake up and he sees me and I don't come and pet him first he will bark until I come there. If I leave the room and go into my room he will bark until I come out. If my dad comes home and doesn't play with him he will bark until my dad plays with him.

How do we break this habit? We've tried just ignoring it, but he will literally go on for half an hour and then I feel bad. Any tips that can help would be great!!

Thank you!
 

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Edited to add - I love the name Arlo!!

Conventional wisdom is to redirect the behavior to something acceptable. But first, consider these questions:
  • Has the puppy eaten recently? Does he need to eat?
  • Does the puppy need to go outside?
  • Has the puppy been physically exercised? (Nothing jumpy or off the ground, but a good game of tug, an interesting sniff walk)
  • Has the puppy been mentally stimulated? (What brain games are you playing with him? Does he have a chance to explore on leash at his pace?
There are many other questions but those will get you started. You have to remember, a 10-month old Doberman is a baby teenage brain in the body of an adult. They are clingy dogs to start with and if he needs aren’t being met, they will meet them in any way available to them.

When you leave the room, the puppy wants to go with you. When someone comes home, the puppy wants to engage with him or her. Beyond food, shelter, and medical care dogs need companionship, they need engagement, they need physical and mental stimuli.

Be sure you can rule out physical ailments...
Be sure you can rule out the need to do his business....
Be sure you can rule out excess energy due to a lack of activity (mental and physical)...
Be sure you can rule out something new or scary or alarming that is happening.....

If you can honestly tell yourself all his needs are met, then be sure you are not:
  • Yelling back
  • Physically scolding
  • Yielding to constant barking IF all of the above needs are met
Try training the puppy to “speak”. This can help educate on what is acceptable barking.
Give the puppy stimulating toys that are appropriate for strong chewers, like a stuffed Kong or similar chew toy.
Play with the puppy, do brain games, sniff walks, hide-and-seek, etc.

Many people think that getting a puppy is great until the real work begins. As you likely know, any dog or puppy isn’t a solitary animal. They want to be near their people and doing something WITH their people. Dobermans were bred to serve the purpose of being with, and guarding, their people. You MUST meet that need.

If you and your family are serious about having a well-behaved Doberman who is a member of the household, start shaping behaviors and training basic commands. By building engagement and a bond with the puppy you will quickly see how fast he can learn what is and isn’t acceptable. Some great books to read are:
  1. How to Speak Dog by Dr. Stanley Coren
  2. Read When Pigs Fly
  3. The Other End of the Leash
  4. How to Behave So Your Dog Behaves
If you can swing it, check out Fenzi Dog Sports Academy for excellent resources on training and behavioral issues.

The Doberman experts will weigh in soon so keep checking back and I wish you good luck! I have a 10-month old puppy who is amazingly smart and well-behaved until he sees another dog, then he screams....so there’s that. It takes a lot of work but is TOTALLY worth it!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Edited to add - I love the name Arlo!!

Conventional wisdom is to redirect the behavior to something acceptable. But first, consider these questions:
  • Has the puppy eaten recently? Does he need to eat?
  • Does the puppy need to go outside?
  • Has the puppy been physically exercised? (Nothing jumpy or off the ground, but a good game of tug, an interesting sniff walk)
  • Has the puppy been mentally stimulated? (What brain games are you playing with him? Does he have a chance to explore on leash at his pace?
There are many other questions but those will get you started. You have to remember, a 10-month old Doberman is a baby teenage brain in the body of an adult. They are clingy dogs to start with and if he needs aren’t being met, they will meet them in any way available to them.

When you leave the room, the puppy wants to go with you. When someone comes home, the puppy wants to engage with him or her. Beyond food, shelter, and medical care dogs need companionship, they need engagement, they need physical and mental stimuli.

Be sure you can rule out physical ailments...
Be sure you can rule out the need to do his business....
Be sure you can rule out excess energy due to a lack of activity (mental and physical)...
Be sure you can rule out something new or scary or alarming that is happening.....

If you can honestly tell yourself all his needs are met, then be sure you are not:
  • Yelling back
  • Physically scolding
  • Yielding to constant barking IF all of the above needs are met
Try training the puppy to “speak”. This can help educate on what is acceptable barking.
Give the puppy stimulating toys that are appropriate for strong chewers, like a stuffed Kong or similar chew toy.
Play with the puppy, do brain games, sniff walks, hide-and-seek, etc.

Many people think that getting a puppy is great until the real work begins. As you likely know, any dog or puppy isn’t a solitary animal. They want to be near their people and doing something WITH their people. Dobermans were bred to serve the purpose of being with, and guarding, their people. You MUST meet that need.

If you and your family are serious about having a well-behaved Doberman who is a member of the household, start shaping behaviors and training basic commands. By building engagement and a bond with the puppy you will quickly see how fast he can learn what is and isn’t acceptable. Some great books to read are:
  1. How to Speak Dog by Dr. Stanley Coren
  2. Read When Pigs Fly
  3. The Other End of the Leash
  4. How to Behave So Your Dog Behaves
If you can swing it, check out Fenzi Dog Sports Academy for excellent resources on training and behavioral issues.

The Doberman experts will weigh in soon so keep checking back and I wish you good luck! I have a 10-month old puppy who is amazingly smart and well-behaved until he sees another dog, then he screams....so there’s that. It takes a lot of work but is TOTALLY worth it!!
Thank you so much! I will for sure check out those books anything to help lol!

I would say of all the times I understand the barking it would be in the morning because he usually has to use the bathroom, otherwise he has plenty of exercise throughout the day and eats his meals like clockwork.

I leave my door open so that he can see me from the hallway when I'm getting ready or whatever it may be but it's not enough. Like I said he's actually a really good, intelligent and loving baby, but the barking can be a lot.

That being said I'll go over the checklist of things next time he has one of these barking fits! Thanks again!! And good luck with your puppy as well!
 

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sandy2233
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Hey all!
This is my first post! Yay!?

My doberman (Arlo) is 10 months old, overall he's really good but sometimes his barking(whining) for attention is out of control. If I wake up and he sees me and I don't come and pet him first he will bark until I come there. If I leave the room and go into my room he will bark until I come out. If my dad comes home and doesn't play with him he will bark until my dad plays with him.

How do we break this habit? We've tried just ignoring it, but he will literally go on for half an hour and then I feel bad. Any tips that can help would be great!!

Thank you!
He has you trained very well.
 

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I have to agree with Sandy... gotta laugh just a little, and I'm sorry for your struggle! You are (unintentionally, I'm sure) reinforcing his barking. He barks until you do what he wants, so he's learned that barking gets him what he wants! It's going to take some work to "un-do" this situation, I'm afraid. It will also probably get worse before it gets better...dogs are VERY determined when something that has BEEN working STOPS working.

You might need the help of a trainer if you aren't super familiar with this kind of thing. You will need to be 100% consistent if you want to make this stop. You'll all have to be on the same page, and will need to 100%, STOP giving in to the barking. He would need to NEVER get what he wants by barking. He will absolutely try HARDER, and bark MORE for a while, because it has always worked before! So it will be really, really hard for a while...and you will have to stay strong, and not give in, or it will be so much worse....but if you are 100% consistent and do not give in, you can get rid of this as an issue. Once he learns that barking doesn't get him anything anymore, it will stop. But again, it takes 100% consistency...so everyone has to commit to doing it. You might want to have a professional trainer coach you through this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have to agree with Sandy... gotta laugh just a little, and I'm sorry for your struggle! You are (unintentionally, I'm sure) reinforcing his barking. He barks until you do what he wants, so he's learned that barking gets him what he wants! It's going to take some work to "un-do" this situation, I'm afraid. It will also probably get worse before it gets better...dogs are VERY determined when something that has BEEN working STOPS working.

You might need the help of a trainer if you aren't super familiar with this kind of thing. You will need to be 100% consistent if you want to make this stop. You'll all have to be on the same page, and will need to 100%, STOP giving in to the barking. He would need to NEVER get what he wants by barking. He will absolutely try HARDER, and bark MORE for a while, because it has always worked before! So it will be really, really hard for a while...and you will have to stay strong, and not give in, or it will be so much worse....but if you are 100% consistent and do not give in, you can get rid of this as an issue. Once he learns that barking doesn't get him anything anymore, it will stop. But again, it takes 100% consistency...so everyone has to commit to doing it. You might want to have a professional trainer coach you through this.
Yeah that's the main problem, consistency. My brother and I are pretty consistent and he's gotten better with me but around my parents he gets whatever he wants!
 

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Eventually, they usually figure out who will cave and give them what they want, and who is not worth spending the energy on LOL ...but it takes time.
 

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How do we break this habit? We've tried just ignoring it, but he will literally go on for half an hour and then I feel bad. Any tips that can help would be great!!

Thank you!
Is it a good, strong Dober bark or no?

I don't personally have a problem with dogs barking (They do that sometimes!) but depending on the particular bark it can be annoying.

My one girl has a pretty impressive bark. Her poor sister though is pitiful at it and no matter how hard she tries it just sounds wrong. 'Wrong' to the point where I will tell her to quiet before any other dogs hear her and want to come bite her face off for sounding so stupid. Reminds me of a kids voice changing. First half of her bark comes out fine then the last part goes to heck in a handbasket.

Bad to the point that when she does it out in public if there are other people around I usually make a point to tell them 'That one is not mine. Just watching her for a friend'. LOL! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Is it a good, strong Dober bark or no?

I don't personally have a problem with dogs barking (They do that sometimes!) but depending on the particular bark it can be annoying.

My one girl has a pretty impressive bark. Her poor sister though is pitiful at it and no matter how hard she tries it just sounds wrong. 'Wrong' to the point where I will tell her to quiet before any other dogs hear her and want to come bite her face off for sounding so stupid. Reminds me of a kids voice changing. First half of her bark comes out fine then the last part goes to heck in a handbasket.

Bad to the point that when she does it out in public if there are other people around I usually make a point to tell them 'That one is not mine. Just watching her for a friend'. LOL! :)
It's more of a bark/whine! He has a big boy bark when he's alert but if he's barking for attention it's a baby bark that as you put it sounds like a kids voice changing 😅

The barking is too much for us lol. We love the guy but it can get excessive
 

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I guess I'd just bite the bullet and treat it as I would too much barking while I'm crate training--if he starts with a demanding bark, get up and leave the room, and don't go back until he stops for a bit. It'll be tough for a while (he's had plenty of time to practice), but if you are consistent EVERY.SINGLE.TIME he starts with the "give me attention now" bark, he should get it--eventually. But it would be better than listening to it for the next 10 years

A word of caution though--an intermittent reward to a problem behavior (sometimes you leave, other times you give in and give him what he wants) makes that behavior really hard to stop. It's like gambling--you're tend to get sucked in and always really want to play the next hand because maybe that next time, you'll get lucky and win. That's what makes gambling so addictive for some folks.
 

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In conventional terms. It's probably because the dog wants something from you, lest it's sick or whatnot uncommon, and a spoiled dog wants something all the time & is difficult to keep satisfied.

Spoiling the dog is a flaw in the owner and not living up to dog's expectations is a flaw in the owner. I think one who has a whining spoiled dog fails twice where one who disciplines the dog fails just once as the former fails on both accounts spoiling [setting high expectations] and not living up to expectations.

Another thing is that it's a dog and it is your house. You can absolutely tell it to stfu and chase it with a broom outside and it is not a stupid creature, it will probably think twice about barking but is this something one should be doing? Probably not because it's like telling the dog to hold it's pee in analogical sense as that hurt of the dog will later find an outlet that you won't like and i am not only talking about possible resentment for chasing it out or fear but that discontent that led to whining as well.

What you should be doing is something in between but this is not so simple because once a dog gets boundaries it can figure to try setting other boundaries for you and you need to be able to deal with this and build a great relationship on mutual respect and endearment.

I think a rule of thumb is don't spoil the dog and make sure it has most meaningful & comfortable life possible. It is said a well trained animals train like this thinking 'what will my master ask me to do today?' where unbroken one's think 'food, food'...

If the dog is disciplined such that it has earned all the priviledges and behaves as if it knows it's like a guest in a human's house who is also it's companion, it will look to make itself useful and if it then whines it is going to be more like a friend rightfully pestering you or asking to go train and whatnot and if you condition a punishment cue then you can just use the cue and it will knock off any excessive whining altogether.

Just now recently dobe here heard something and hair stood up and it started serious barking which is rare and i said 'no' three times, which i conditioned as predictor of punishment cue and the dog was ignoring it, then i calmly said the punishment cue and instantly barking stopped and she calmed down, no punishment at all just conditioned verbal communication.

It works the same when she whines and pesters me which she does all the time if i let her, if i let her follow me around she will do it, if i let her drool over my food she will do it, if i let her bark incessantly she will do it but i say the punishment cue and she knocks off whatever it is she's doing and just conforms to reasonable asks. It depends on the level of excitement if low excitement then a no works, and one can use the voice to modify the cue to curb enthusiasm or obsessive mindsets. I think this is the balanced approach, because the dog will always push it and you have to keep it grounded, calm & happy.

I am not dogmatic about this but these are my general opinions and some things may be wrong, i don't exclude that possibility.
 

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I am wholeheartedly convinced that Operant Conditioning communication training just complements Clicker training and is superior to that extent. It is the same principle of giving preceding cues, one before reward, another cue to keep doing what the dog is doing (potentially preceding the former reward cue) with added cue preceding punishment and a cue to try something else (potentially preceding punishment cue). They pick it up very fast and one can teach it with 200 grams boiled chicken and poking the dog for punishment or stop play or whatnot but it's important that cues actually preceed the things in start consistently and later one can phase out the actual reward and punishment altogether.

I think most people are doing this to some extent naturally when they say good boy, yes, no, knock it off, apply leash pressure, yank the dog around and whatnot but with no consistency a dog has zero chance of figuring out any system and won't know when it is okey to disobey, try new things or make a mistake and when it should be pissing itself as you are really pissed. If it can't tell it will be very anxious because it can't predict big mistakes and will annoy you as well.

Another point is that the dog will figure out it's routine and remind you that it's ready for that 2nd walk;) Therefore one should think about things like how you feed the dog and what schedule it's on and see if it they can be learn to be comfortable with what is agreeable to you long term. I think minimal for a healthy dog is being able to go pee and to exercise, id feed once a day lest sick and i've found that tugging is the best exercise as it quickly tires them out and can be played safely. If one can get in 1-2 walks per day to experience the world it's good as well. It doesn't take much more and if you occasionally play a bit with him here and there when he maybe looks anxious he will appreciate it and it builds bond a lot. I like to gently grapple with the dog and headbut it a bit, it plays gently and it's very chill for both and makes the dog relax a lot. I've seen dogs play similarly and do it occasionally as therapy for dog and owner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
is this american type or just young?
Honestly I'm not sure. I wasn't there when my brothers got him, and up until 3 months ago I didn't even know there were different kinds (sorry please don't come for me) . From what my brother tells me he's euro and he's going to get broader. The picture doesn't do it justice but he has a huge chest
 

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is this american type or just young?

@ with... If you read schris's (the OP's) opening comment, which is what this whole discussion revolves around, you will see that Arlo is 10 months old. In fact, his age, IMO, should be one of the main considerations when talking about any developing behavioral issues.

John Lichtwardt
Portland OR
 

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Hey all!
This is my first post! Yay!?

My doberman (Arlo) is 10 months old, overall he's really good but sometimes his barking(whining) for attention is out of control. If I wake up and he sees me and I don't come and pet him first he will bark until I come there. If I leave the room and go into my room he will bark until I come out. If my dad comes home and doesn't play with him he will bark until my dad plays with him.

How do we break this habit? We've tried just ignoring it, but he will literally go on for half an hour and then I feel bad. Any tips that can help would be great!!

Thank you!

put him on a schedule so he knows!!! Works perfect with my 5 month old he is so smart don’t underestimate a Doberman they test us mine wines and I know every morning he wants to pee right away and poop
 
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