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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, Im new to the site but wanted to sign up and ask you guys your opinions on my Female Dobbie. Shes now 10 months old and weighs 50lbs. Her height is around 24 1/2 to 3/4. She did catch parvo as a pup that we treated at the vet in isolation and she did really well and was never in any serious danger. She handled it very well considering the disease. Anyway Im thinking that may be the cause of her being under weight if thats even the case which I believe it is. Her are a couple of pictures. She was about 8 months in these





These are from a couple of days ago.



Shes still a very narrow girl and hasnt filled out yet which I expect her to do sometime after she turns a year old. Im curious if theres anything I can feed her to help boost her growth again if thats even needed. I read so many stories about Dobermans being over 80 lbs as females and I was under the impression that the breed didnt really get that big usually. This is my first Doberman so Im really in the dark about it. Any input on her height and weight would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Hard to tell if she is skinny from the pictures, but it seems to me that she is just an average, more petite female Doberman. By your stats, it sounds like she will be right in the height standard for a female, and she will most likely be closer to 60lbs plus when she matures more. 80lbs for a show line doberman female is most likely a bit heavy. Most bitches I like are right around 65-70lb.
 

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She looks good to me! Very cute!!

Mine is 9 1/2 months old and probably weighs 60lbs (maybe slightly under 60) at approx 27"

I don't think many females get up to 80lbs. I've heard 65-75 many times though.
 

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Hi welcome to the forum, she is cute!

From the pictures, she just looks like a petite girl she doesnt look underweight. Its difficult to tell from the photos you've posted though, do you have any from above or standing sideways on? You should be able to easily feel ribs but not easily see them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys. Her mom was around 65 I think. Here is a link to her mom
4s Farm
Here is her father. I think hes around 80-85
4s Farm
Also there family history is listed. Ill get some updated pics later this evening. The last two I put up were in the car and not very good ones. Shes a pretty girl in my opinion I just want to make sure shes healthy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi welcome to the forum, she is cute!

From the pictures, she just looks like a petite girl she doesnt look underweight. Its difficult to tell from the photos you've posted though, do you have any from above or standing sideways on? You should be able to easily feel ribs but not easily see them.
Its funny you mention that because when I try and pick her up I can feel them but they arent visible at all.
 

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Thanks guys. Her mom was around 65 I think. Here is a link to her mom
4s Farm
Here is her father. I think hes around 80-85
4s Farm
Also there family history is listed. Ill get some updated pics later this evening. The last two I put up were in the car and not very good ones. Shes a pretty girl in my opinion I just want to make sure shes healthy.
Sorry to say, but with the pedigree you listed and a breeder who does not health test, but this will be difficult to make sure she is healthy. It is too late now, but please research the deadly diseases that effect this breed so that you can test your little girl when appropriately aged.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sorry to say, but with the pedigree you listed and a breeder who does not health test, but this will be difficult to make sure she is healthy. It is too late now, but please research the deadly diseases that effect this breed so that you can test your little girl when appropriately aged.
What diseases are you referring to? I dont know much about the breed or the breeder as we tried to find one locally. Im not the type that is concerned with family pedigree and AKC, CKC etc papers which we have stuffed in a box somewhere in my basement. I also dont know anything about the health tests. She goes to our vet regularly and gets regular check ups as do our other 2 dogs. The vet wasnt concerned about her height/weight. He said it was normal but I wanted another opinion from other dobbie owners.
 

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What diseases are you referring to? I dont know much about the breed or the breeder as we tried to find one locally. Im not the type that is concerned with family pedigree and AKC, CKC etc papers which we have stuffed in a box somewhere in my basement. I also dont know anything about the health tests. She goes to our vet regularly and gets regular check ups as do our other 2 dogs. The vet wasnt concerned about her height/weight. He said it was normal but I wanted another opinion from other dobbie owners.
Bold mine.
When you want to be as sure as possible that your dog will be healthy, especially an unhealthy breed like this, than pedigree is SUPER important. You want to know how the dogs in the pedigree have died. Was it old age? Was it injury? Or was it a heritable disease?

You also want full health testing on the parent's (and hopefully their parents, etc) and this is not a vet check but includes testing blood (vWD status), eyes, hips, heart, thyroid, etc. These are individual specific tests. These are important because A) it shows the breeder cares about the dogs s/he is creating and B) you're more likely to get a healthy dog from proven to be healthy parents than from unhealthy/unknown ones.

As to the health problems in this breed I think you'll find this page (and the whole DPCA site) to be a good read - http://dpca.org/breed/breed_health.htm




Edit to answer the question - Anyways, from the pictures provided she looks fine but a picture with her standing (especially one where you can see her from the side) would make it easier to tell. I personally like to be able to see the last rib or two and easily feel the ribs and spine. However, I do like my dogs on the slightly lean side.
 

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What diseases are you referring to? I dont know much about the breed or the breeder as we tried to find one locally. Im not the type that is concerned with family pedigree and AKC, CKC etc papers which we have stuffed in a box somewhere in my basement. I also dont know anything about the health tests. She goes to our vet regularly and gets regular check ups as do our other 2 dogs. The vet wasnt concerned about her height/weight. He said it was normal but I wanted another opinion from other dobbie owners.
Things you should know about are problems like Dilated Cardiomyopathy, the number one killer of Dobes. Chronic Active Hepatits, another killer. Hip dyslasia, von, Willbrands (a bleeding disorder), and hypothyroidism. Those are just what I can think of off the top of my head. This is the link to the DPCA website's health section DPCA | The Doberman | Health.


From what I can see, she looks to be at a good weight, and you don't want a fat dog.
 

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Just want to repeat this.
you don't want a fat dog.
I was working with lab mice once and for the experiment we kept them at 80% of what their free feeding weight would be. This kept them a little lean and yes, a little hungry. However, over the hears that my professor has worked with rats he found that the ones that were kept on the leaner side (not emaciated, not super skinny, just not plump) not only lived longer but showed to be overall healthier.

Fat, or even slightly meaty, is not healthy. It puts more weight and stress on the bones and joints which is a problem that only gets worse as the dog ages.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
When we bought her I did speak with the breeder of course. I also got to meet and play with the parents. They were both fairly older as I remember and seemed to be in good health but thats only based on what I could see. The breeder did mention that there was no known hereditary diseases in his dogs. Ill ask my vet about some of these on our next visit.

As far as future health issues go I can only say when we met GG, our Dobbie, we fell in love with her. Shes full of energy and she does her best to please us. She often goes into my lake to catch fish and leaves them on my doorstep. Shes done the same with chicken eggs, and smaller animals. I want to strangle her sometimes for it because its just gross and I have to clean it up but I know she does it out of kindness. If any health issues may arise I can assure you she will get the best medical attention possible period. I have a Min Pin that was attacked about a year ago by a friends dog. He lost an eye, several teeth, and has permanent damage to his sinus cavities. So far hes racked up about $7k worth of surgeries and vet visits. So I may go broke doing it but I will see to it that my dogs be taken care of to the best of my financial situation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
GG stays in a kennel approx 8 hours daily while Im at work. Her daily routine usually consists of her getting out of bed when I do and she may run down and get a quick couple of mouthfuls of food and then she goes in he kennel til I get home. When I get home Ill put some food in the bowl so the 3 of my dogs can share it. She usually gets a few bites right before bed sometimes as well. Overall she doesnt eat that much despite that I keep food down for them at all times. It works out great though because theyve all done a pretty good job regulating themselves. I dont know if you can tell in the pictures but Little Girl my 6 year old Pit is about 55-60lbs and is very very lean and muscular. Skitzo the Min Pin is a healthy 8 lbs of lean muscle. GG Ive already mentioned is 50lbs but I think she just hasnt got to the age where she has filled out, wishful thinking of course. But one thing is for sure, she isnt fat or over weight by and stretch lol. I should also mention I feed them Diamond Performance Formula. Ive fed my dogs that for years without any issues. Iam aware of Diamonds recalls and have kept up with the serial numbers that they have recalled. Ive debated on changing their food but havent come to any conclusion on it.
 

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When we bought her I did speak with the breeder of course. I also got to meet and play with the parents. They were both fairly older as I remember and seemed to be in good health but thats only based on what I could see. The breeder did mention that there was no known hereditary diseases in his dogs. Ill ask my vet about some of these on our next visit.
The part I bolded is an important one. I'm sorry, but all that means is that they have never tested for them. Roughly 50% of ALL Dobermans will develop DCM. Your best bet, now that you have your girl, is to read up on the problems that the breed is prone to, and keep on top of things, by doing annual bloodwork, and starting when she is about 2 years old, do a baseline Holter test, and repeat that every couple of years, at least.

One thing you need to know NOW is your girls vWD status. You can have the test done yourself through a company called VetGen. The result will be one of the following: Clear, Carrier, or Affected. If she is Clear or Carrier, you don't have anything to worry about there, but, if she is Affected, the possibility for serious problems is there. Not all genetically affected dogs are clinically affected, but a clinically affected dog is a high risk during surgeries or if they get injured.
 

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I would suggest not free feeding (keeping food down at all times) and also giving each dog their own bowl.

The reason for each dog having their own bowl is that aggression problems can occur over food and it can be quite nasty.

As for the free feeding - some people do it throughout their dogs life with no problem but I"m not a fan. Usually when a dog is not feeling well or is seriously sick the first thing that changes is eating habits and a vet will likely ask you how the dog has been eating. That is a VERY hard question to answer when food is not measured out for the dog and/or the dog is sharing food with other dogs.
 

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GG stays in a kennel approx 8 hours daily while Im at work. Her daily routine usually consists of her getting out of bed when I do and she may run down and get a quick couple of mouthfuls of food and then she goes in he kennel til I get home. When I get home Ill put some food in the bowl so the 3 of my dogs can share it. She usually gets a few bites right before bed sometimes as well. Overall she doesnt eat that much despite that I keep food down for them at all times. It works out great though because theyve all done a pretty good job regulating themselves.
Please note the sentence I bolded. In my opinion, that's a fight waitng to happen. All three of my dogs (and all 8 cats) get their own bowl, in their own space. All three dogs play together, but I would trust them loose around food about as far as I could throw them.

Also, you don't know if one of them isn't eating normally, and you have no idea how much each one is eating. One of the first things my vet asks me whenever I take anyone (cat or dog) in is "What do you feed, how much do you feed, and how often do you feed it?". All you can say is "well, I filled the bowl and it's empty, so someone ate it".
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I would suggest not free feeding (keeping food down at all times) and also giving each dog their own bowl.

The reason for each dog having their own bowl is that aggression problems can occur over food and it can be quite nasty.

As for the free feeding - some people do it throughout their dogs life with no problem but I"m not a fan. Usually when a dog is not feeling well or is seriously sick the first thing that changes is eating habits and a vet will likely ask you how the dog has been eating. That is a VERY hard question to answer when food is not measured out for the dog and/or the dog is sharing food with other dogs.
Ive been free feeding throughout all of there lives but you do make a good point. For the most part Im present when they are feeding. They do seem to present a level of respect for one another at the food bowl. For example of one is eating another will stand back and literally wait their turn. In the end we are dealing with animals though so you can never count out food aggression so I do follow you on the subject. Its just so time consuming lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The part I bolded is an important one. I'm sorry, but all that means is that they have never tested for them. Roughly 50% of ALL Dobermans will develop DCM. Your best bet, now that you have your girl, is to read up on the problems that the breed is prone to, and keep on top of things, by doing annual bloodwork, and starting when she is about 2 years old, do a baseline Holter test, and repeat that every couple of years, at least.

One thing you need to know NOW is your girls vWD status. You can have the test done yourself through a company called VetGen. The result will be one of the following: Clear, Carrier, or Affected. If she is Clear or Carrier, you don't have anything to worry about there, but, if she is Affected, the possibility for serious problems is there. Not all genetically affected dogs are clinically affected, but a clinically affected dog is a high risk during surgeries or if they get injured.
I understand where you are coming from and I do appreciate the info because Id otherwise never followed up on it. Im going to get call Vet Gen today!
 
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