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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 1 yr old female runs at me full speed and bumps and nips me. I fenced off the lawn so she could run. She won't run and get exercise when I'm not out there but she tears my clothes. She goes to obedience classes, her breeder said try a shock collar because I can't catch her and the yard is large and this can't continue.
 

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Eat Poo and Die
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A yard is not sufficient exercise for a Doberman. How often is she walked? Does she get to go on hikes or runs? How do you currently correct her for nipping at you? What do you redirect to? :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have 5 acres so the fenced area is huge, she runs and runs. Also we go for walks daily. She nips only when she runs free. I have a can w/coins that makes noise but I don't always have it with me to shake. If I throw a ball she runs with that in her mouth but still bumps against me. She nips and then races off so I can't correct her. It ends when I make it to safety and get her in the house. I have put obedience degrees on everything from a tiny yorkie to Irish wolfhounds, but this is my 1st Doberman.
 

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If the nipping and out-of-control behaviour happens only when your girl is chasing the ball, it sounds as if it could help to establish a routine for this activity. We went through this, too, and setting up — and enforcing — a strict protocol cleared up the problem behaviour.

First, I would buy or make a tab that you can attach to her collar so that you have something to grab if she becomes over-excited and starts nipping.

If she has been to obedience classes, she presumably knows "sit," so work on making ball throwing a reward for sitting. No throw unless she is sitting calmly. She also needs to know "give" or an equivalent command (as well as "take"). If she doesn't, this is really worth teaching.

So . . . "sit" (praise and throw the the ball). When she returns with the ball in her mouth, "sit" and "give." If necessary, use the tab to enforce the command and make sure she's calm before throwing the ball again.

Good luck.
 

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If the nipping and out-of-control behaviour happens only when your girl is chasing the ball, it sounds as if it could help to establish a routine for this activity. We went through this, too, and setting up — and enforcing — a strict protocol cleared up the problem behaviour.

First, I would buy or make a tab that you can attach to her collar so that you have something to grab if she becomes over-excited and starts nipping.

If she has been to obedience classes, she presumably knows "sit," so work on making ball throwing a reward for sitting. No throw unless she is sitting calmly. She also needs to know "give" or an equivalent command (as well as "take"). If she doesn't, this is really worth teaching.

So . . . "sit" (praise and throw the the ball). When she returns with the ball in her mouth, "sit" and "give." If necessary, use the tab to enforce the command and make sure she's calm before throwing the ball again.

Good luck.
thats great advice
 

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It's called drive by's. Ask how I know.

You'll have to teach her that you are not a toy and that she can't drive-by to engage you to play. Does she have a favorite toy? a tug, or a ball, or something appropriate? get her to do something for you, like sit, then you initiate play with the favorite toy. Have two toys - get her to come to you then exchange toys. She'll learn coming to you has a reward. If she tries to up the game by doing a drive-by, disengage. Get a long leash and work with her in the yard on recall. Put her in a sit - on leash - then you walk away the length of the leash while she sits. Then call her to you - reel her in with the leash if she doesn't come on her own. Praise!! Remember to praise the good behavior. She won't want to come to be scolded or corrected.
 

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Please don't use a shock collar on your girl for this sort of thing. It must be frustrating, but punishment only leads to more punishment, and a shock collar can ruin a dog. Personally, I'd look to switch trainers, if this is the only advice they felt inclined to give.

It sounds wild, but you might want to take that "running at you" behavior and turn it into something. That's kind of a recall, wouldn't you say? That's nameable and rewardable, and will confuse the heck out of her at first, which diverts the nipping. I don't know about your dog's size or your physique, but you could also train a "jump into my arms". Of course, you have to be looking for this, not caught unawares.

The idea of making your dog work for her toy, and calm and be focused, is a fantastic one. And what your trainer should have come up with.

So far as correction goes, if she doesn't play nice, her toy goes away. Be it the ball, the tug...or you. Drive by? You go inside. When you come back out, call her and reward her if she comes. That kind of thing. She should be happy that you're there, but not to maul at you.
 

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This is what I would do, in no particular order.

Work on a better recall. Work on a better leave it.

What type of bite inhibition have you done, and what training methods are you familiar with? What kind of daily mental stimulation does your dog get, and how often do you train?
 

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Eli did something akin to that to me until he was about 1 1/2 years. I sat on top of a wooden fence or behind it at the lake when Eli was really ripping around. I also used the baseball stop at the park to protect myself, I didn't want my knees smashed. If your dog is really biting and hurting you I would use an ecollar myself but you need to know how to use and need to teach a command to stop the behavior first. Eli did out grow it so you can protect yourself with fences or even a large walking stick, putting it out in front of you and holding it steady. I did that alot also, he wouldn't run into that. I would keep your dog on a long line for now while you are in the yard with her, then you can step on it and correct if she is biting you and running away, you can work on recall and a good firm sit in front of you which should help a great deal, it did for Eli. It must be a doberman thing. I have about a lot of dobermans that do this and having many dogs in my life I have never ever had a dog besides Eli who did this. Eli never bit me though he just slammed into me.
 

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Thanks for all the suggestions, I will try them. Treats don't help because she's running around too fast to notice them even when I say "cookie". I'm also not fast enough to grab anything on her collar and have too many trees, etc a long line could get caught on. I'm going to work more obedience, especially recall. I have all sorts of dog educational toys for her, but there are no other dogs for her to play with. I'm going to try a spray bottle today.
 

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Elke used to be really bad about doing this type of thing, then she got better with training. Recently with her anxiety issues and hyper energy, she started doing it again. We are working on increased training and I am not letting her get away with it (I use a firm "sit" or "down" when she starts doing this type of thing). It is working wonders in a short time.

With my dog, it comes from hyper energy and trying to get her way, so increased exercise and more training focus are helping.
 

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I was going to suggest a spray bottle, or maybe even an air horn..something to startle her into snapping out of it. Something that doesn't hurt her, but will get her attention and make it clear that running into you has negative consequences.
 

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She don't need an e-collar / for being a little excited & frisky.

OP...lots of great advise, thus far.

If your dog is running so fast as to knock into your knees and bowl you over plus take a quick nip at you...On outside RECALL, I would:
- lift up the sole of my shoe, in front of me & keep my bent leg still
- dog will slow down & stop, or risk running head first into the stationary boot bottom
Dogs are smart enough to quickly figure out, it needs to slow down...coming near the owner.
 

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I would not use a e- collar when Buddy did that at that age I would turn my back to him or go into the house.Did not take him long to figure out when he got wild no mom to play with, Used a long line to step on when he did not come when called & reeled him in sometimes you need to wear gloves. I have a Total knee + a bad back so could not tolerate the possibility of getting knocked down. Good Luck
 

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Oh man I had this problem with Layla for so long, and all the trainers here really are useless.

So I had to figure something else out. And someone already said it, sitting to play is fantastic. Now out in the garden she speeds over to me, halts herself ans sits perfectly looking up at me waiting to see what we're going to play with today.

I'm not sure startling and these kinds of things work on dobe's in my opinion. Because they are so people oriented, the minute she jumped up or nipped, I say "NO" firmly, turn my back and walk straight back into the house and ignore her.

Very simple - nipping and jumping = fun stops. And she;s not the kinda girl who'll go off and entertain herself because she's all about me, so this worked wonders for me.

Also because your dobe is so bonded to you (as you mentioned she won't go out and play without you), the next time she nips, make a high, exaggerated squeal sound like she really hurt you and you'll see the aeroplane ears and the saddest biggest eyes look up immediately at you. This is a GREAT tool for me and she's terrified of hurting me again, not because she'll be punished, but because she genuinely thinks she hurt her mum. Sometimes the best way to communicate with a dog is to do what a dog would do if it was hurt.

Be patient and give her time to understand you. It will go away, I promise.

Let us know how you get on! :)
 

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Thanks for all the suggestions, I will try them. Treats don't help because she's running around too fast to notice them even when I say "cookie". I'm also not fast enough to grab anything on her collar and have too many trees, etc a long line could get caught on. I'm going to work more obedience, especially recall. I have all sorts of dog educational toys for her, but there are no other dogs for her to play with. I'm going to try a spray bottle today.
A long line should not get caught especially if the end does not have a handle. I use one with one of my dogs and there are a ton of trees.

I feel it's very important that you have one on her. Because as soon as she starts to do the bad behavior you can correct with the long line. Part of your dogs fun is that she knows you cannot get her. The long line only has to be 10-15 feet.
 
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