Bully sticks each day OK? - Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums
Puppy Corner Everything Puppy related goes here

 6Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-17-2017, 08:45 AM Thread Starter
Big Pup
 
GameOfDobermans's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 37
Dogs Name: Tell us your dogs name

Gallery Pics: 0
Visit GameOfDobermans's Gallery
Thanks: 27
Thanked 34 Times in 13 Posts
   
Bully sticks each day OK?

Hello,
Our 4-1/2 month female Dobe Brienne loves bully sticks, especially the braided ones. I buy them online from the Best Bully Sticks website which I think I read about on this forum as being a reputable company to get them from.
My question is how many is too many per day? We give her the 6" ones either braided or straight and it occupies her or settles her down when we do. Sometimes she gets 2 a day. Sometimes she goes right through the whole thing, other times she just chews on it for a bit and leaves it till later. She has no problem with her stools and still eats 3 times a day no problem but I didn't know if there was a limit on how many she should have per day?
Thanks for all the advice!
GameOfDobermans is offline  
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-17-2017, 10:09 AM
Alpha
 
Beaumont67's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 10,838
Location: St. Thomas, Ontario
Dogs Name: Kelly
Titles: CD Obedience & Therapy
Dogs Age: puppy
Gallery Pics: 0
Visit Beaumont67's Gallery
Thanks: 54,182
Thanked 22,540 Times in 8,837 Posts
                     
Never used Bully sticks, and gave up on Rawhide bones (some 40 years ago).
- I won't feed our Dobe anything I wouldn't eat myself...if stranded on a deserted island
- we are what we eat / dogs included

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

FOOD GUIDE LINES Bully Stick Treats: Delicious and Dangerous

Bully sticks, also known as pizzle sticks, are an increasingly popular treat for dog owners. Dogs love the taste and texture, and parents love their long-lasting, natural source of protein they provide. But, there are a lot of misconceptions surrounding these tasty sticks of meat.

In a study published in the Canadian Veterinary Journal, Tufts University, researchers analyzed the bully sticks both for their nutritional values and for their potential to harbor bacteria. The team also revealed several common misconceptions about the popular chewy treats through a series of interviews to consumers and veterinarians. You might be surprised by their results!

Misconception: Bully sticks are a healthy, low-calorie snack.
Truth: Bully sticks are actually found to be very high in calories, containing between 9 and 22 calories per inch.

Researchers analyzed 26 bully sticks sold across Canada and the United States by different retailers and brands. On average, a 6-inch bully stick contains around 88 calories, that’s 9% of the daily calorie requirements for a 50-pound dog, and 30% of the daily calorie requirements for a 10-pound dog. With dog obesity on the rise, thanks in big part to the popularity of treats and chews as an easy way for pet owners to reward good dog behavior or entertain a restless pooch, pet parents need to take into consideration the extra calories these treats add to their dog’s diet, and compensate by cutting back on their food intake.

“While calorie information isn’t currently required on pet treats or most pet foods, these findings reinforce that veterinarians and pet owners need to be aware of pet treats like these bully sticks as a source of calories in a dog’s diet,” said Lisa M. Freeman, DVM, PhD, DACVN, professor of nutrition at TCSVM who is board-certified by the American College of Veterinary Nutrition.

Misconception: Bully sticks are completely safe and free from contaminates.
Truth: The popular treats are known to harbor dangerous bacteria, harmful if not handled correctly.

All 26 treats were tested for bacterial contaminants. 4% of the sticks were contaminated with Clostridium difficile; 4% were contaminated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a type of staph bacteria that is resistant to certain antibiotics; and 27% were contaminated with Escherichia coli, including one tetracycline-resistant sample.

The number of treats sampled was small and not all of these bacterial strains have been shown to infect humans. However, the researchers advise all pet owners to wash their hands after touching such treats. The very young, elderly, pregnant, immuno-compromised and other high-risk individuals should avoid all contact with the treats.

Misconception: Bully sticks contain no by-products
Truth: Bully sticks ARE a by-product.

To learn more about consumer and veterinary perceptions of their dogs’ food and treats, the researchers conducted a 20-question online survey for a period of 60 days. Of the, mostly female, dog owner respondents, 71% stated that they avoid animal by-products in their dog’s food and treats. However, for all intents and purposes, a bully stick IS a by-product. According to Dog Food Advisor, animal by-products are what’s left of a slaughtered animal after the edible parts have been removed. They include the waste of meat processing not intended for human consumption. This can include feet, beaks, brains, kidneys, stomachs, and, in the case of bully sticks, the animal’s penis.

While bully sticks only contain one part of the animal, not the rendered “stew” of leftovers commonly found in lower quality pet foods, they are still, in essence, considered a by-product.

Misconception: Bully sticks are cooked strips of beef.
Truth: Bully sticks are uncooked, raw, dried strips of beef penis.

Because manufacturers don’t come right out and say it on the packaging, instead opting for words like “pizzle,” most people surveyed did not know what the treats were actually made of. Only 44% of consumers knew that the sticks were made from the penis of a male cow. Even more surprising, only 66% of veterinarians knew what the bully sticks are made of!No information was provided on what percentage of consumers and veterinarians knew that the bully sticks are uncooked, dried, raw strips of meat.

Further research with a larger sample size is needed to determine whether the calorie content and contamination rate found in this study is representative of all bully sticks, or other types of pet treats, according to the authors. To see the full report, click here.

While it’s now been proven that bully sticks may pose a health risk to the dogs that eat them and the owners that handle them, they aren’t all bad. Because they are made from 100% beef, they are both highly palatable and easily digestible by dogs. They are an excellent source of quality protein and taurine, an amino acid that acts as a catalyst facilitating the flow of vital elements to and from cells. And, there are many manufacturers that provide natural or organic bully sticks that do not contain any additives, chemicals, preservatives, antibiotics, hormones or steroids. Plus, they provide a safer alternative to rawhide chews, which are not easily digested and pose a choking hazard, while satisfying your dog’s urge to chew.

Bottom line, if you’re able to get past the psychological barrier of feeding your dog a bully stick after knowing what they’re made from, look for a brand you trust, wash your hands after handling them, and adjust your dog’s diet to compensate for the additional calories their getting.

Does your dog enjoy bully sticks? Did any of these research findings surprise you?
Bully Stick Treats: Delicious and Dangerous - The Dogington Post
dobebug and burkehinman like this.

------------Kelly & (Amy - RIP @ 11.7 y/o)

Last edited by Beaumont67; 12-17-2017 at 10:20 AM.
Beaumont67 is online now  
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Beaumont67 For This Useful Post:
4x4bike ped (12-17-2017), dobebug (12-18-2017), dobegal (12-17-2017), Gretchen_Red (12-18-2017)
post #3 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-17-2017, 03:09 PM
Big Lil pup
 
4x4bike ped's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 5,655
Location: Portland, OR
Dogs Name: Foxfire's The Real McCoy (McCoy)
Titles: Pet of the Year
Dogs Age: DOB 9/12/14
Gallery Pics: 9
Visit 4x4bike ped's Gallery
Thanks: 14,278
Thanked 13,007 Times in 4,591 Posts
Images: 9
                     
Hi Game.

Our youngest (3yo) has basically a cast iron stomach. He can accommodate any digestible.

The one exception is bull pizzle, commercially sold as "Bully Sticks". At the very least, it causes loose stools. My biggest problem is that he devours a 12"-14" bully stick in minutes (seconds?). Dobes are prone to intestinal issues and blockages. I gave them up as treats years ago. Like Beau, I also no longer treat with rawhide chews. And, it has been decades since I have allowed them to gnaw on weight supporting bones (beef femurs for example), either fresh, smoked or cooked . I would look into calf or beef "knuckle bones"

https://www.naturesmenu.co.uk/raw-beef-knuckle-bone

All this is just my opinion based on my personal experience.

John
Portland OR

Last edited by 4x4bike ped; 12-17-2017 at 03:11 PM.
4x4bike ped is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to 4x4bike ped For This Useful Post:
Beaumont67 (12-17-2017), dobegal (12-17-2017)
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-17-2017, 03:13 PM
Super Moderator
 
MeadowCat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 19,076
Location: MN
Dogs Name: Richter; Sypha; RIP Shanoa & Simon
Titles: Richter: CAA L1V NW1 L1I L1E L1C NW2 L2V ACT1 RATI WAC; Sypha: NW1 NW2 L1C L1V L1E RATI SOG WAC
Dogs Age: d.o.b. 7/13/2012; d.o.b. 12/6/2015
Gallery Pics: 1
Visit MeadowCat's Gallery
Thanks: 46,581
Thanked 56,128 Times in 15,397 Posts
Images: 1
                     
Click here to find out how MeadowCat became a supporter
Bully sticks are really high in calories. Your dog may be able to handle them fine digestively, but you may find it difficult weight wise at some point. I think you'll also find over time that as your dog gets older they do not last as long as a chew

I would suggest looking into Kongs - we stuff Kongs with their food, mixed up with other goodies...things like cottage cheese, or yogurt, or a little bit of premade raw like Honest Kitchen, add in goodies like fruit, etc., then freeze the Kong. It will take dogs a lot longer to eat them, and you are using up their regular amount of calories instead of adding in extra calories like a bully stick. It's also pretty mentally tiring to work for their food. There are a TON of good Kong stuffing ideas online!


DSC_0133
by Shanoa Delta, on Flickr

Richter & Sypha
Glengate's Mountain Fortress CAA ORT L1V NW1 L1I L1E L1C NW2 L2V L2I ACT1 RATI WAC
& Sirai's Golden Masquerade ORT NW1 L1C L1V L1E NW2 RATI SOG WAC
“You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you.
What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.”
― Jane Goodall
MeadowCat is online now  
The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to MeadowCat For This Useful Post:
4x4bike ped (12-17-2017), dobegal (12-17-2017), greenkouki (12-23-2017), Gretchen_Red (12-18-2017), melbrod (12-17-2017), Rosemary (12-17-2017)
post #5 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-17-2017, 04:34 PM
Alpha
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 7,558

Gallery Pics: 0
Visit dobebug's Gallery
Thanks: 11,234
Thanked 21,173 Times in 5,738 Posts
                     
I just plain don't give any of the "treats" like raw hide, pig, cow or sheep ears, or bully sticks. The bully sticks I eliminated after one try--I couldn't stand the smell when the dog was chewing on it nor the dogs breath (and I feed a fish based kibble) after he chewede the thing up--and then I ran into an article in a vet publication right about the time they got popular and found out they were high calory and it wasn't what they were but the fact that the drying process left a lot of bacteria that could be potentially harmful.
dobebug is offline  
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to dobebug For This Useful Post:
4x4bike ped (12-17-2017), Beaumont67 (12-17-2017), Cressrb (12-17-2017), greenkouki (12-23-2017), Gretchen_Red (12-18-2017)
post #6 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-17-2017, 08:38 PM
Alpha
 
Cressrb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,574
Location: Utah
Dogs Name: Irongates East of the Sunrise, aka 'Jada' CGC, WAC, GrCh. Cha-Rish Mine To Imagine, WAC
Titles: CGC, CH. WAC GCH
Dogs Age: DOB:5/21/12, 1/26/15
Gallery Pics: 0
Visit Cressrb's Gallery
Thanks: 9,252
Thanked 5,417 Times in 1,970 Posts
                     
Click here to find out how Cressrb became a supporter
My daughter would give 'Duggan' a bully stick every day before leaving for school.
He was so crazy about them she thought she was being kind.
He ended up with an anal gland infection that took several different kinds of antibiotics
to clear. We all felt the bully sticks were the culprit, including the vet.
That is the point we quit the bully sticks and rawhide bones and saved ourselves alot of
money besides.
dobebug likes this.

"Lots of people talk to animals...Not very many listen, though...That's the problem. " ~ The Tao of Pooh
Cressrb is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Cressrb For This Useful Post:
4x4bike ped (12-17-2017), dobebug (12-18-2017)
post #7 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-18-2017, 07:08 AM
well trained hooman
 
RADAR2017's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 748
Location: St. Paul, MN
Dogs Name: Radar
Titles: King of the couch
Dogs Age: DOB July 29, 2017
Gallery Pics: 2
Visit RADAR2017's Gallery
Thanks: 65
Thanked 1,842 Times in 602 Posts
Images: 2
                     
looks like I will be putting Radar's bully stick away (in the trash) when I get home today. Too bad, because he really does like them. The smell is awful though, and I was looking into the "odor free/low odor" versions online...guess I can take those out of my Amazon cart!

Anyone have other alternative chews that they like? My guy is in the throes of teething and sometimes he will not accept just a toy or his kong to chew on. I have also been giving him a frozen carrot in the morning to gnaw on in his crate. We do training at least 3x per day, and generally any time I have any type of free time at home, so he is usually tired from that, but I need to keep him away from the TV stand...

"Money can buy a lot of things, but it doesn't wiggle its butt every time you walk in the door."

RADAR2017 is offline  
post #8 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-18-2017, 09:15 AM
Alpha
 
Cressrb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,574
Location: Utah
Dogs Name: Irongates East of the Sunrise, aka 'Jada' CGC, WAC, GrCh. Cha-Rish Mine To Imagine, WAC
Titles: CGC, CH. WAC GCH
Dogs Age: DOB:5/21/12, 1/26/15
Gallery Pics: 0
Visit Cressrb's Gallery
Thanks: 9,252
Thanked 5,417 Times in 1,970 Posts
                     
Click here to find out how Cressrb became a supporter
I feel for you going through this stage. It is always a challenge trying to stay ahead of them and outwit them.
Kongs are the best and puzzle type toys that you can hide treats in.
Someone mentioned site that had all the ideas for filling kongs and freezing.

"Lots of people talk to animals...Not very many listen, though...That's the problem. " ~ The Tao of Pooh
Cressrb is offline  
post #9 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-18-2017, 11:38 AM
Alpha
 
Gretchen_Red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 3,378
Location: Denver
Dogs Name: Gretchen and Maverick
Titles: CGCA, RE, RATN and Supreme bed destroyer
Dogs Age: 21 mo and 6mo.
Gallery Pics: 14
Visit Gretchen_Red's Gallery
Thanks: 7,067
Thanked 5,011 Times in 2,065 Posts
Images: 14
                     
I fed my puppy's a bully stick maybe twice a week or once a week? I don't worry too much about Calorie consumption at that age because they tend to burn them all off and then some. I still give my dogs bully sticks but it's closer to once a month.

I would also suggest switching it up with Kongs, sawed off cow femurs are great for teething puppies. Also, you can use a wash clothe soaked in chicken broth and then frozen in the freezer. Be careful with the wash clothe though as they can tear it up so make sure you supervise.
Gretchen_Red is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Gretchen_Red For This Useful Post:
dmoore (12-18-2017)
post #10 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-18-2017, 12:39 PM
Alpha
 
LadyDi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 3,743
Location: Florida
Dogs Name: Hoss
Titles: Proud European Doberman
Dogs Age: 3
Gallery Pics: 3
Visit LadyDi's Gallery
Thanks: 21,452
Thanked 7,670 Times in 3,028 Posts
Images: 3
                     
Click here to find out how LadyDi became a supporter
Hoss is approaching 2 years but still loves to chew....Marrow bones to rich and high in calorie ....also tried the bully sticks but just not comfortable seeing him swallow that stuff so quickly......so ....several months ago I began using a Kong....but Hoss is a messy eater....once the kong was filled with food he would hold the kong as high up in the air as he could and then drop it....he would repeat this over and over again...trying to get the food to fall out versus licking it out......what a big mess....In attempt to outsmart the Dobie I tried something that would not so easily fall out.......pupsicles!
ice cube tray.....fill up the tray with kibble or a single cookie....etc.....then fill the tray up with water and freeze.
Stuffed the ice cubes into the Kong....puppy popsicles!! I won.... I won... I won !!!!!! LOL

Freeze some of your pups favorite flavored baby food in the ice cube trays .....(not as cheap as kibble) but also works good.....

Hoss
LadyDi is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to LadyDi For This Useful Post:
4x4bike ped (12-18-2017), RADAR2017 (12-18-2017)
post #11 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-18-2017, 12:52 PM
well trained hooman
 
RADAR2017's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 748
Location: St. Paul, MN
Dogs Name: Radar
Titles: King of the couch
Dogs Age: DOB July 29, 2017
Gallery Pics: 2
Visit RADAR2017's Gallery
Thanks: 65
Thanked 1,842 Times in 602 Posts
Images: 2
                     
Thanks for the suggestions guys. I have a couple Kongs now that I give him in his crate as well, usually as a lunch-time substitute. I mix about a third of his kibble portion for lunch with about a tsp of cottage cheese, tsp of pumpkin, and some ripped up lunch meat/hot dog (or whatever other dog friendly food happens to be in my fridge), then use about 1/4 of his normal portion for a quick training session while I'm at home. (so he gets roughly half of his lunch in kibble, the other in the "mixture" of the day.) He also likes mashed potatoes mixed with a little chicken broth and frozen.

I also get one RMB from the butcher per month, and give it to him for about 30 mins at a time, then back in the freezer. This is my "secret weapon" for when he just needs to calm the heck down but doesn't necessarily need to be in his crate. I will look into knuckle bones as well.

What I like about bully sticks is that he takes a very long time to go through them. He has been working on the current one (12" braided) for a little over a month now. That seems super gross to me now knowing that it is 'wet' when he is done with it, and he just leaves it wherever he wants (in his bed, on the rug, etc). Also the smell is awful, especially because it takes him so long.

I'm thinking about trying elk antler chews as they are supposedly the "softest" and good for puppies, but they are so expensive! I have a couple nylabones that he likes to chew every once in a while, but he is definitely not crazy about them.

ETA @Gretchen_Red he (surprisingly) doesn't really tear anything up, but I would definitely supervise. So far the only "destruction" he has done was a little gnawing on SO's tv stand (his own fault for taking a nap and not putting puppy in crate) and I let him smush and tear up the rolls of toilet paper/paper towels when they are empty, then I take them away before he starts ripping off pieces and trying to eat them.

"Money can buy a lot of things, but it doesn't wiggle its butt every time you walk in the door."


Last edited by RADAR2017; 12-18-2017 at 12:56 PM.
RADAR2017 is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to RADAR2017 For This Useful Post:
Gretchen_Red (12-18-2017)
post #12 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-18-2017, 03:22 PM
Eschew Prolixity
 
melbrod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 21,266
Location: Colorado
Dogs Name: Ori AKA Harold DogDog (Hairy Dog), RIP Caesar, Katana, Kip, Capri
Titles: DogDog Mouthe Extraordinaire; Kip Mr. Behavior; Capri Mis-Behavior
Dogs Age: DogDog 2 yrs?; RIP Kip 11 yrs; Capri 7 yrs; Katana 9 yrs; Caesar 13 yrs
Gallery Pics: 6
Visit melbrod's Gallery
Thanks: 61,981
Thanked 52,770 Times in 17,097 Posts
Images: 6
                     
Click here to find out how melbrod became a supporter
Mine didn’t particularly like antlers and Nylabones were only good for stepping on with bare feet in the middle of the night.
BudnHouston and LadyDi like this.
melbrod is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to melbrod For This Useful Post:
Cressrb (12-18-2017), greenkouki (12-23-2017)
post #13 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-18-2017, 04:38 PM
Alpha
 
Cressrb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,574
Location: Utah
Dogs Name: Irongates East of the Sunrise, aka 'Jada' CGC, WAC, GrCh. Cha-Rish Mine To Imagine, WAC
Titles: CGC, CH. WAC GCH
Dogs Age: DOB:5/21/12, 1/26/15
Gallery Pics: 0
Visit Cressrb's Gallery
Thanks: 9,252
Thanked 5,417 Times in 1,970 Posts
                     
Click here to find out how Cressrb became a supporter
You too? I tell my husband, I know they deliberately placed that bone in the middle of the hallway.

"Lots of people talk to animals...Not very many listen, though...That's the problem. " ~ The Tao of Pooh
Cressrb is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Cressrb For This Useful Post:
melbrod (12-18-2017)
post #14 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-18-2017, 05:01 PM
Eschew Prolixity
 
melbrod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 21,266
Location: Colorado
Dogs Name: Ori AKA Harold DogDog (Hairy Dog), RIP Caesar, Katana, Kip, Capri
Titles: DogDog Mouthe Extraordinaire; Kip Mr. Behavior; Capri Mis-Behavior
Dogs Age: DogDog 2 yrs?; RIP Kip 11 yrs; Capri 7 yrs; Katana 9 yrs; Caesar 13 yrs
Gallery Pics: 6
Visit melbrod's Gallery
Thanks: 61,981
Thanked 52,770 Times in 17,097 Posts
Images: 6
                     
Click here to find out how melbrod became a supporter
They chew them up just enough that the ends are all jagged and spiky, and then booby-trap the place.
melbrod is offline  
post #15 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-20-2017, 11:57 AM
Alpha
 
BudnHouston's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 191
Location: Houston
Dogs Name: UNO
Dogs Age: 11-11-2012
Gallery Pics: 2
Visit BudnHouston's Gallery
Thanks: 111
Thanked 295 Times in 86 Posts
Images: 2
                   
Click here to find out how BudnHouston became a supporter
We've been using Closet All Natural 6" Crunchy Bully Sticks. Gluten Free, Grain Free, Soy Free, No Artificial Ingredients. 100% Beef Pizzle. Our pup loves them, and one occupies him for 45 minutes to an hour. We only give him around 4-5 a week, and usually at night when he goes into his zoomy mode. Settles him, and us down.

I never knock personal experience, but the majority of evidence shows that bones and rawhide are not good for dogs.

Bones, never. By Dr. Becker

It’s the oldest cliché in the book: Dogs love to chew on bones. But the FDA is warning that this time-honored tradition could be dangerous—and even deadly—for dogs.

“Some people think it’s safe to give dogs large bones, like those from a ham or a roast,” says Dr. Carmela Stamper, a veterinarian in the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine. “Bones are unsafe no matter what their size. Giving your dog a bone may make your pet a candidate for a trip to your veterinarian’s office later, possible emergency surgery, or even death.”

The FDA doesn’t make clear whether their warning extends to all bones or just cooked bones, so I’ll assume for purposes of the information I’m about to give you they’re discussing only bones from food that has been cooked.

Dangers of Cooked Bones

The cooking process makes bones more brittle, increasing the likelihood they might splinter and cause internal injury to your dog.

Cooking can also remove the nutrition contained in bones.

In their April 20, 2010 Consumer Update, the FDA lists the following risks associated with giving your dog a cooked bone to chew:
1.Broken teeth. This may call for expensive veterinary dentistry.
2.Mouth or tongue injuries. These can be very bloody and messy and may require a trip to see your veterinarian.
3.Bone gets looped around your dog’s lower jaw. This can be frightening or painful for your dog and potentially costly to you, as it usually means a trip to see your veterinarian.
4.Bone gets stuck in esophagus, the tube that food travels through to reach the stomach. Your dog may gag, trying to bring the bone back up, and will need to see your veterinarian.
5.Bone gets stuck in windpipe. This may happen if your dog accidentally inhales a small enough piece of bone. This is an emergency because your dog will have trouble breathing. Get your pet to your veterinarian immediately!
6.Bone gets stuck in stomach. It went down just fine, but the bone may be too big to pass out of the stomach and into the intestines. Depending on the bone’s size, your dog may need surgery or upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, a procedure in which your veterinarian uses a long tube with a built-in camera and grabbing tools to try to remove the stuck bone from the stomach.
7.Bone gets stuck in intestines and causes a blockage. It may be time for surgery.
8.Constipation due to bone fragments. Your dog may have a hard time passing the bone fragments because they’re very sharp and they scrape the inside of the large intestine or rectum as they move along. This causes severe pain and may require a visit to your veterinarian. Bones also contain a lot of calcium, which is very firming to the stool.
9.Severe bleeding from the rectum. This is very messy and can be dangerous. It’s time for a trip to see your veterinarian.
10.Peritonitis. This nasty, difficult-to-treat bacterial infection of the abdomen is caused when bone fragments poke holes in your dog’s stomach or intestines. Your dog needs an emergency visit to your veterinarian because peritonitis can kill your dog.

Rawhide, even worse. These are the most common rawhide risks:
• Contamination. As with pet toys, rawhide chews can contain trace amounts of toxic chemicals. And, as with other pet (or human) foods, Salmonella or E. coli contamination is possible. Even humans can be at risk when coming into contact with these bacteria on rawhide treats.
• Digestive irritation. Some dogs are simply sensitive or allergic to rawhide or other substances used in their manufacture. This can cause problems, including diarrhea.
• Choking or blockages. Rawhide bones and other edible chews can pose a choking and blockage risk. In fact, this is a much bigger risk than contamination or digestive irritation. If your dog swallows large pieces of rawhide, the rawhide can get stuck in the esophagus or other parts of the digestive tract. Depending on its size and where it is located, a vet may be able to remove these pieces fairly easily through the throat. But sometimes, abdominal surgery is needed to remove them from the stomach or intestines. If it isn’t resolved, a blockage can lead to death.
BudnHouston is offline  
post #16 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-20-2017, 11:59 AM
Alpha
 
BudnHouston's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 191
Location: Houston
Dogs Name: UNO
Dogs Age: 11-11-2012
Gallery Pics: 2
Visit BudnHouston's Gallery
Thanks: 111
Thanked 295 Times in 86 Posts
Images: 2
                   
Click here to find out how BudnHouston became a supporter
Check this out on manufacture of Rawhide chews.

https://www.google.com/search?q=maki...=1513792668738
BudnHouston is offline  
post #17 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-20-2017, 12:12 PM
Super Moderator
 
MeadowCat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 19,076
Location: MN
Dogs Name: Richter; Sypha; RIP Shanoa & Simon
Titles: Richter: CAA L1V NW1 L1I L1E L1C NW2 L2V ACT1 RATI WAC; Sypha: NW1 NW2 L1C L1V L1E RATI SOG WAC
Dogs Age: d.o.b. 7/13/2012; d.o.b. 12/6/2015
Gallery Pics: 1
Visit MeadowCat's Gallery
Thanks: 46,581
Thanked 56,128 Times in 15,397 Posts
Images: 1
                     
Click here to find out how MeadowCat became a supporter
Quote:
Originally Posted by RADAR2017 View Post
Thanks for the suggestions guys. I have a couple Kongs now that I give him in his crate as well, usually as a lunch-time substitute. I mix about a third of his kibble portion for lunch with about a tsp of cottage cheese, tsp of pumpkin, and some ripped up lunch meat/hot dog (or whatever other dog friendly food happens to be in my fridge), then use about 1/4 of his normal portion for a quick training session while I'm at home. (so he gets roughly half of his lunch in kibble, the other in the "mixture" of the day.) He also likes mashed potatoes mixed with a little chicken broth and frozen.

I also get one RMB from the butcher per month, and give it to him for about 30 mins at a time, then back in the freezer. This is my "secret weapon" for when he just needs to calm the heck down but doesn't necessarily need to be in his crate. I will look into knuckle bones as well.

What I like about bully sticks is that he takes a very long time to go through them. He has been working on the current one (12" braided) for a little over a month now. That seems super gross to me now knowing that it is 'wet' when he is done with it, and he just leaves it wherever he wants (in his bed, on the rug, etc). Also the smell is awful, especially because it takes him so long.

I'm thinking about trying elk antler chews as they are supposedly the "softest" and good for puppies, but they are so expensive! I have a couple nylabones that he likes to chew every once in a while, but he is definitely not crazy about them.

ETA @Gretchen_Red he (surprisingly) doesn't really tear anything up, but I would definitely supervise. So far the only "destruction" he has done was a little gnawing on SO's tv stand (his own fault for taking a nap and not putting puppy in crate) and I let him smush and tear up the rolls of toilet paper/paper towels when they are empty, then I take them away before he starts ripping off pieces and trying to eat them.
I do feed occasional bully sticks and I think they are fine in moderation. If Radar is taking a month (wow!!!) for a stick, that would be totally fine by me! My dogs can chomp through one in about...20 min? Easily. So I wouldn't worry about that.

I also do raw bones from the butcher (RAW! for those reading along, NOT cooked or smoked or anything like that...USE CAUTION!). Mine get 30 minutes with those. I personally only choose to let them chew knuckle bones, not the long leg bones with marrow, because they are softer and there is less risk of fractured teeth, but almost every chew carries some risk. Dogs WILL chew and you choose what you are comfortable with.

Elk antler chews are still hard and there is still risk. My own dogs don't like them, but I know some dogs that go absolutely nuts for them. Sypha also really loved the "inner horn" chew we bought from a show last year (they'll be at the big show at the St. Paul River Center that first weekend in January, if you are going to go). They have a TON of treats! She worked on that one off and on for like, a year I can't remember the name of the vendor of the top of my head.


DSC_0133
by Shanoa Delta, on Flickr

Richter & Sypha
Glengate's Mountain Fortress CAA ORT L1V NW1 L1I L1E L1C NW2 L2V L2I ACT1 RATI WAC
& Sirai's Golden Masquerade ORT NW1 L1C L1V L1E NW2 RATI SOG WAC
“You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you.
What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.”
― Jane Goodall
MeadowCat is online now  
post #18 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-20-2017, 01:22 PM
well trained hooman
 
RADAR2017's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 748
Location: St. Paul, MN
Dogs Name: Radar
Titles: King of the couch
Dogs Age: DOB July 29, 2017
Gallery Pics: 2
Visit RADAR2017's Gallery
Thanks: 65
Thanked 1,842 Times in 602 Posts
Images: 2
                     
Quote:
Originally Posted by MeadowCat View Post
I do feed occasional bully sticks and I think they are fine in moderation. If Radar is taking a month (wow!!!) for a stick, that would be totally fine by me! My dogs can chomp through one in about...20 min? Easily. So I wouldn't worry about that.
Yeah, he takes forever, he hasn't finished one yet. I generally will just wait until he gets it small enough that I worry he will try to swallow it, then replace it with a new one. He sort of treats it like dogs that like to "suck" blankets. He will chew and gnaw it, but he really doesn't do much damage to it. Eventually the pieces just get so worn from his chewing that they can't hold on anymore. My biggest problem is the smell as of now. His favorite place to chew it is at our feet in front of the couch, so the scent just floods us while we are watching tv...gross.

Quote:
Elk antler chews are still hard and there is still risk. My own dogs don't like them, but I know some dogs that go absolutely nuts for them. Sypha also really loved the "inner horn" chew we bought from a show last year (they'll be at the big show at the St. Paul River Center that first weekend in January, if you are going to go). They have a TON of treats! She worked on that one off and on for like, a year I can't remember the name of the vendor of the top of my head.
Yeah I'm not sure that I will even try antlers till his new teeth are "set", especially because I don't want to fork over 20+ dollars for a small piece of antler.

Unfortunately I won't be able to make it to that show, even though I really wanted to! That weekend is SO's birthday and we are going for a weekend in Northfield. If you catch the name of the vendor please send me the name! I would like to contact them and possibly order if they can do that sort of thing.

"Money can buy a lot of things, but it doesn't wiggle its butt every time you walk in the door."

RADAR2017 is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to RADAR2017 For This Useful Post:
MeadowCat (12-20-2017)
post #19 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-20-2017, 01:30 PM
Super Moderator
 
MeadowCat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 19,076
Location: MN
Dogs Name: Richter; Sypha; RIP Shanoa & Simon
Titles: Richter: CAA L1V NW1 L1I L1E L1C NW2 L2V ACT1 RATI WAC; Sypha: NW1 NW2 L1C L1V L1E RATI SOG WAC
Dogs Age: d.o.b. 7/13/2012; d.o.b. 12/6/2015
Gallery Pics: 1
Visit MeadowCat's Gallery
Thanks: 46,581
Thanked 56,128 Times in 15,397 Posts
Images: 1
                     
Click here to find out how MeadowCat became a supporter
Quote:
Originally Posted by RADAR2017 View Post
Yeah, he takes forever, he hasn't finished one yet. I generally will just wait until he gets it small enough that I worry he will try to swallow it, then replace it with a new one. He sort of treats it like dogs that like to "suck" blankets. He will chew and gnaw it, but he really doesn't do much damage to it. Eventually the pieces just get so worn from his chewing that they can't hold on anymore. My biggest problem is the smell as of now. His favorite place to chew it is at our feet in front of the couch, so the scent just floods us while we are watching tv...gross.



Yeah I'm not sure that I will even try antlers till his new teeth are "set", especially because I don't want to fork over 20+ dollars for a small piece of antler.

Unfortunately I won't be able to make it to that show, even though I really wanted to! That weekend is SO's birthday and we are going for a weekend in Northfield. If you catch the name of the vendor please send me the name! I would like to contact them and possibly order if they can do that sort of thing.
I found them! Four Paws Gourmet. It's a local company, but you can order online, too. Four Paws Gourmet. Check out the bull inner horn - this is what Sypha loved! Bull Inner Horn ? Four Paws Gourmet I highly recommend treats from this company...have loved everything we've purchased.

If you haven't tried any Benebones yet, my dogs both really like those. They won't chew Nylabones, but Benebones are a big hit. You can find them at Target or the petstores. They really like the ones that are shaped like this Benebone - it's like they are perfect for holding in chewing position.


DSC_0133
by Shanoa Delta, on Flickr

Richter & Sypha
Glengate's Mountain Fortress CAA ORT L1V NW1 L1I L1E L1C NW2 L2V L2I ACT1 RATI WAC
& Sirai's Golden Masquerade ORT NW1 L1C L1V L1E NW2 RATI SOG WAC
“You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you.
What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.”
― Jane Goodall
MeadowCat is online now  
post #20 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-20-2017, 03:04 PM
well trained hooman
 
RADAR2017's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 748
Location: St. Paul, MN
Dogs Name: Radar
Titles: King of the couch
Dogs Age: DOB July 29, 2017
Gallery Pics: 2
Visit RADAR2017's Gallery
Thanks: 65
Thanked 1,842 Times in 602 Posts
Images: 2
                     
Quote:
Originally Posted by MeadowCat View Post
I found them! Four Paws Gourmet. It's a local company, but you can order online, too. Four Paws Gourmet. Check out the bull inner horn - this is what Sypha loved! Bull Inner Horn ? Four Paws Gourmet I highly recommend treats from this company...have loved everything we've purchased.

If you haven't tried any Benebones yet, my dogs both really like those. They won't chew Nylabones, but Benebones are a big hit. You can find them at Target or the petstores. They really like the ones that are shaped like this Benebone - it's like they are perfect for holding in chewing position.
That inner bull horn looks like something he would like! He really likes the marrow bones with filling inside them, and of course loves the raw marrow bones, so I'm sure he would like it. Just curious, the website says that they are high in calcium and phosphorous, do you think that would be harmful to a pup? I mean, I'm sure all bones are high in those two since that's what they are made of, but I don't want to cause any growth issues.

I have seen the Benebones at the local PS+. I may have to get one to try out since he hasn't really touched his nylabones in a while. That might have something to do with teething; he is still dropping teeth fairly consistently so they probably hurt his mouth. Do you use the largest size for your dogs? I have been leaning towards getting the biggest of everything because he is growing so fast.

"Money can buy a lot of things, but it doesn't wiggle its butt every time you walk in the door."

RADAR2017 is offline  
post #21 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-20-2017, 03:14 PM
Super Moderator
 
MeadowCat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 19,076
Location: MN
Dogs Name: Richter; Sypha; RIP Shanoa & Simon
Titles: Richter: CAA L1V NW1 L1I L1E L1C NW2 L2V ACT1 RATI WAC; Sypha: NW1 NW2 L1C L1V L1E RATI SOG WAC
Dogs Age: d.o.b. 7/13/2012; d.o.b. 12/6/2015
Gallery Pics: 1
Visit MeadowCat's Gallery
Thanks: 46,581
Thanked 56,128 Times in 15,397 Posts
Images: 1
                     
Click here to find out how MeadowCat became a supporter
Quote:
Originally Posted by RADAR2017 View Post
That inner bull horn looks like something he would like! He really likes the marrow bones with filling inside them, and of course loves the raw marrow bones, so I'm sure he would like it. Just curious, the website says that they are high in calcium and phosphorous, do you think that would be harmful to a pup? I mean, I'm sure all bones are high in those two since that's what they are made of, but I don't want to cause any growth issues.

I have seen the Benebones at the local PS+. I may have to get one to try out since he hasn't really touched his nylabones in a while. That might have something to do with teething; he is still dropping teeth fairly consistently so they probably hurt his mouth. Do you use the largest size for your dogs? I have been leaning towards getting the biggest of everything because he is growing so fast.
I guess I wouldn't worry much unless you are letting him chew that bone every day for a long time. That's just me...if you are particularly worried I'd give a quick call to the vet. Those aren't something I'd let a pup chew for a long time every day and I'm sure he won't actually consume much of it. Sypha literally chewed on ONE of them for an entire year.

I use the largest Benebones.

If he's losing a lot of teeth right now, some people will also do things like take a heavy duty washcloth or dishrag, soak it in chicken broth, and tie it in knots and freeze it and let them chew it. Can be soothing on sore gums - kind of like a teething ring for babies.

My dogs as puppies have also liked softer toys (supervised) - we did things like the Go Dog toys or the Tuffy toys, so they were pretty "tough" but also more "chewable." They eventually couldn't have them, but as puppies they could.


DSC_0133
by Shanoa Delta, on Flickr

Richter & Sypha
Glengate's Mountain Fortress CAA ORT L1V NW1 L1I L1E L1C NW2 L2V L2I ACT1 RATI WAC
& Sirai's Golden Masquerade ORT NW1 L1C L1V L1E NW2 RATI SOG WAC
“You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you.
What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.”
― Jane Goodall
MeadowCat is online now  
post #22 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-20-2017, 03:54 PM
well trained hooman
 
RADAR2017's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 748
Location: St. Paul, MN
Dogs Name: Radar
Titles: King of the couch
Dogs Age: DOB July 29, 2017
Gallery Pics: 2
Visit RADAR2017's Gallery
Thanks: 65
Thanked 1,842 Times in 602 Posts
Images: 2
                     
Quote:
Originally Posted by MeadowCat View Post
I guess I wouldn't worry much unless you are letting him chew that bone every day for a long time. That's just me...if you are particularly worried I'd give a quick call to the vet. Those aren't something I'd let a pup chew for a long time every day and I'm sure he won't actually consume much of it. Sypha literally chewed on ONE of them for an entire year.

I use the largest Benebones.

If he's losing a lot of teeth right now, some people will also do things like take a heavy duty washcloth or dishrag, soak it in chicken broth, and tie it in knots and freeze it and let them chew it. Can be soothing on sore gums - kind of like a teething ring for babies.

My dogs as puppies have also liked softer toys (supervised) - we did things like the Go Dog toys or the Tuffy toys, so they were pretty "tough" but also more "chewable." They eventually couldn't have them, but as puppies they could.
He generally gets bored with bones (except the raw) after about 30 mins, so that shouldn't be a big deal. I will probably ask the vet just to be sure. I will try the dishrag. He seems like he only cares about them if I tie a knot in the middle....?

He is a big fan of the Kong "knots" toys. we have one that is a fox and a small one that's a squirrel. He will chew, suck, or shake/throw, depending on his mood.

"Money can buy a lot of things, but it doesn't wiggle its butt every time you walk in the door."

RADAR2017 is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to RADAR2017 For This Useful Post:
MeadowCat (12-20-2017)
post #23 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-23-2017, 06:32 AM Thread Starter
Big Pup
 
GameOfDobermans's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 37
Dogs Name: Tell us your dogs name

Gallery Pics: 0
Visit GameOfDobermans's Gallery
Thanks: 27
Thanked 34 Times in 13 Posts
   
Zoomy mode! Love it! Perfect description of Brienne some nights, not all, but some. It's pretty hilarious. She corners around the coffee table like she's on rails (Pretty Woman movie reference ).


Quote:
Originally Posted by BudnHouston View Post
We've been using Closet All Natural 6" Crunchy Bully Sticks. Gluten Free, Grain Free, Soy Free, No Artificial Ingredients. 100% Beef Pizzle. Our pup loves them, and one occupies him for 45 minutes to an hour. We only give him around 4-5 a week, and usually at night when he goes into his zoomy mode. Settles him, and us down.

I never knock personal experience, but the majority of evidence shows that bones and rawhide are not good for dogs.

Bones, never. By Dr. Becker

It’s the oldest cliché in the book: Dogs love to chew on bones. But the FDA is warning that this time-honored tradition could be dangerous—and even deadly—for dogs.

“Some people think it’s safe to give dogs large bones, like those from a ham or a roast,” says Dr. Carmela Stamper, a veterinarian in the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine. “Bones are unsafe no matter what their size. Giving your dog a bone may make your pet a candidate for a trip to your veterinarian’s office later, possible emergency surgery, or even death.”

The FDA doesn’t make clear whether their warning extends to all bones or just cooked bones, so I’ll assume for purposes of the information I’m about to give you they’re discussing only bones from food that has been cooked.

Dangers of Cooked Bones

The cooking process makes bones more brittle, increasing the likelihood they might splinter and cause internal injury to your dog.

Cooking can also remove the nutrition contained in bones.

In their April 20, 2010 Consumer Update, the FDA lists the following risks associated with giving your dog a cooked bone to chew:
1.Broken teeth. This may call for expensive veterinary dentistry.
2.Mouth or tongue injuries. These can be very bloody and messy and may require a trip to see your veterinarian.
3.Bone gets looped around your dog’s lower jaw. This can be frightening or painful for your dog and potentially costly to you, as it usually means a trip to see your veterinarian.
4.Bone gets stuck in esophagus, the tube that food travels through to reach the stomach. Your dog may gag, trying to bring the bone back up, and will need to see your veterinarian.
5.Bone gets stuck in windpipe. This may happen if your dog accidentally inhales a small enough piece of bone. This is an emergency because your dog will have trouble breathing. Get your pet to your veterinarian immediately!
6.Bone gets stuck in stomach. It went down just fine, but the bone may be too big to pass out of the stomach and into the intestines. Depending on the bone’s size, your dog may need surgery or upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, a procedure in which your veterinarian uses a long tube with a built-in camera and grabbing tools to try to remove the stuck bone from the stomach.
7.Bone gets stuck in intestines and causes a blockage. It may be time for surgery.
8.Constipation due to bone fragments. Your dog may have a hard time passing the bone fragments because they’re very sharp and they scrape the inside of the large intestine or rectum as they move along. This causes severe pain and may require a visit to your veterinarian. Bones also contain a lot of calcium, which is very firming to the stool.
9.Severe bleeding from the rectum. This is very messy and can be dangerous. It’s time for a trip to see your veterinarian.
10.Peritonitis. This nasty, difficult-to-treat bacterial infection of the abdomen is caused when bone fragments poke holes in your dog’s stomach or intestines. Your dog needs an emergency visit to your veterinarian because peritonitis can kill your dog.

Rawhide, even worse. These are the most common rawhide risks:
• Contamination. As with pet toys, rawhide chews can contain trace amounts of toxic chemicals. And, as with other pet (or human) foods, Salmonella or E. coli contamination is possible. Even humans can be at risk when coming into contact with these bacteria on rawhide treats.
• Digestive irritation. Some dogs are simply sensitive or allergic to rawhide or other substances used in their manufacture. This can cause problems, including diarrhea.
• Choking or blockages. Rawhide bones and other edible chews can pose a choking and blockage risk. In fact, this is a much bigger risk than contamination or digestive irritation. If your dog swallows large pieces of rawhide, the rawhide can get stuck in the esophagus or other parts of the digestive tract. Depending on its size and where it is located, a vet may be able to remove these pieces fairly easily through the throat. But sometimes, abdominal surgery is needed to remove them from the stomach or intestines. If it isn’t resolved, a blockage can lead to death.
GameOfDobermans is offline  
post #24 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-23-2017, 06:39 AM Thread Starter
Big Pup
 
GameOfDobermans's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 37
Dogs Name: Tell us your dogs name

Gallery Pics: 0
Visit GameOfDobermans's Gallery
Thanks: 27
Thanked 34 Times in 13 Posts
   
The title of this article is scary but when you read through it at the bottom it says bully sticks are basically OK if you wash your hands after handling and can get past the fact they are a dried bull's penis and I can live with that.

I haven't had much success with the Kong. I used peanut butter and she couldn't clean it all out and the dishwasher didn't do a much better job. I'll try them again though with some of the other suggested items. Maybe keep a few in the freezer at a time as she usually has a bully stick very early in the morning in my office while I'm on the computer.

Thank you all for your input! Much appreciated!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Beaumont67 View Post
Never used Bully sticks, and gave up on Rawhide bones (some 40 years ago).
- I won't feed our Dobe anything I wouldn't eat myself...if stranded on a deserted island
- we are what we eat / dogs included

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

FOOD GUIDE LINES Bully Stick Treats: Delicious and Dangerous

Bully sticks, also known as pizzle sticks, are an increasingly popular treat for dog owners. Dogs love the taste and texture, and parents love their long-lasting, natural source of protein they provide. But, there are a lot of misconceptions surrounding these tasty sticks of meat.

In a study published in the Canadian Veterinary Journal, Tufts University, researchers analyzed the bully sticks both for their nutritional values and for their potential to harbor bacteria. The team also revealed several common misconceptions about the popular chewy treats through a series of interviews to consumers and veterinarians. You might be surprised by their results!

Misconception: Bully sticks are a healthy, low-calorie snack.
Truth: Bully sticks are actually found to be very high in calories, containing between 9 and 22 calories per inch.

Researchers analyzed 26 bully sticks sold across Canada and the United States by different retailers and brands. On average, a 6-inch bully stick contains around 88 calories, that’s 9% of the daily calorie requirements for a 50-pound dog, and 30% of the daily calorie requirements for a 10-pound dog. With dog obesity on the rise, thanks in big part to the popularity of treats and chews as an easy way for pet owners to reward good dog behavior or entertain a restless pooch, pet parents need to take into consideration the extra calories these treats add to their dog’s diet, and compensate by cutting back on their food intake.

“While calorie information isn’t currently required on pet treats or most pet foods, these findings reinforce that veterinarians and pet owners need to be aware of pet treats like these bully sticks as a source of calories in a dog’s diet,” said Lisa M. Freeman, DVM, PhD, DACVN, professor of nutrition at TCSVM who is board-certified by the American College of Veterinary Nutrition.

Misconception: Bully sticks are completely safe and free from contaminates.
Truth: The popular treats are known to harbor dangerous bacteria, harmful if not handled correctly.

All 26 treats were tested for bacterial contaminants. 4% of the sticks were contaminated with Clostridium difficile; 4% were contaminated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a type of staph bacteria that is resistant to certain antibiotics; and 27% were contaminated with Escherichia coli, including one tetracycline-resistant sample.

The number of treats sampled was small and not all of these bacterial strains have been shown to infect humans. However, the researchers advise all pet owners to wash their hands after touching such treats. The very young, elderly, pregnant, immuno-compromised and other high-risk individuals should avoid all contact with the treats.

Misconception: Bully sticks contain no by-products
Truth: Bully sticks ARE a by-product.

To learn more about consumer and veterinary perceptions of their dogs’ food and treats, the researchers conducted a 20-question online survey for a period of 60 days. Of the, mostly female, dog owner respondents, 71% stated that they avoid animal by-products in their dog’s food and treats. However, for all intents and purposes, a bully stick IS a by-product. According to Dog Food Advisor, animal by-products are what’s left of a slaughtered animal after the edible parts have been removed. They include the waste of meat processing not intended for human consumption. This can include feet, beaks, brains, kidneys, stomachs, and, in the case of bully sticks, the animal’s penis.

While bully sticks only contain one part of the animal, not the rendered “stew” of leftovers commonly found in lower quality pet foods, they are still, in essence, considered a by-product.

Misconception: Bully sticks are cooked strips of beef.
Truth: Bully sticks are uncooked, raw, dried strips of beef penis.

Because manufacturers don’t come right out and say it on the packaging, instead opting for words like “pizzle,” most people surveyed did not know what the treats were actually made of. Only 44% of consumers knew that the sticks were made from the penis of a male cow. Even more surprising, only 66% of veterinarians knew what the bully sticks are made of!No information was provided on what percentage of consumers and veterinarians knew that the bully sticks are uncooked, dried, raw strips of meat.

Further research with a larger sample size is needed to determine whether the calorie content and contamination rate found in this study is representative of all bully sticks, or other types of pet treats, according to the authors. To see the full report, click here.

While it’s now been proven that bully sticks may pose a health risk to the dogs that eat them and the owners that handle them, they aren’t all bad. Because they are made from 100% beef, they are both highly palatable and easily digestible by dogs. They are an excellent source of quality protein and taurine, an amino acid that acts as a catalyst facilitating the flow of vital elements to and from cells. And, there are many manufacturers that provide natural or organic bully sticks that do not contain any additives, chemicals, preservatives, antibiotics, hormones or steroids. Plus, they provide a safer alternative to rawhide chews, which are not easily digested and pose a choking hazard, while satisfying your dog’s urge to chew.

Bottom line, if you’re able to get past the psychological barrier of feeding your dog a bully stick after knowing what they’re made from, look for a brand you trust, wash your hands after handling them, and adjust your dog’s diet to compensate for the additional calories their getting.

Does your dog enjoy bully sticks? Did any of these research findings surprise you?
Bully Stick Treats: Delicious and Dangerous - The Dogington Post
GameOfDobermans is offline  
post #25 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-23-2017, 08:06 AM
well trained hooman
 
RADAR2017's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 748
Location: St. Paul, MN
Dogs Name: Radar
Titles: King of the couch
Dogs Age: DOB July 29, 2017
Gallery Pics: 2
Visit RADAR2017's Gallery
Thanks: 65
Thanked 1,842 Times in 602 Posts
Images: 2
                     
@GameOfDobermans it may be easier for your dog to clean out the kong if you use something a little less sticky than pb. That much peanut butter isn't healthy any way. Depending on the size of the kong, I will mix whatever amount of kibble fits in it (about half cup in puppy kong, about 1 cup ish in xl) and some kind of "sticky" stuff...ie pumpkin, mashed potatoes, cottage cheese, yogurt. Just enough to make the kibble stick together. That way it will be easier to get the last bits out. I generally will plug the ends with peanut butter and freeze, but to start I would leave it thawed. Also try to keep the small end clear so that suction doesn't build up. I fill the whole kong then like a bendy straw through the bottom hole, all the way through to the top, and out, then put it in the freezer.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

"Money can buy a lot of things, but it doesn't wiggle its butt every time you walk in the door."

RADAR2017 is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to RADAR2017 For This Useful Post:
MeadowCat (12-23-2017)
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome