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  Topic Review (Newest First)
06-15-2019 12:00 AM
4x4bike ped Easy steven.... Take a step back here.

You are talking to folks, many of whom have dealt with Dilated Cardiomyopathy, myself included.

It is a very touchy and emotional subject.

There are many folks here who keep this disease constantly in the forefront of their mind.

We are not ignorant and the responses that you are generally getting are going to be based on research and personal experience.

Let's make this a nice and educational thread, not an "I am done with this" thread.

OK?

John
Portland OR
and... The Butcher (RIP 2013... via DCM SDS v-tach)
06-13-2019 10:16 AM
stevenroberto ""I'm just really at a loss as to what you expect from the people on this list.""

I dont want anything from anyone on the list. I just shared a link to what I think was a good documentary on DCM. That was all. Some people piled on me like seagulls on food scraps. If you dont like the documentary you dont need to say anything. It is my bad for bothering to respond.

I am done with this.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Fitzmar Dobermans View Post
You think I was being condescending?? I respectfully will tell you that I'm not. Maybe there is a language barrier in the translation, and as my spanish is poor, I can't help that.
I can also tell you that I don't know what help passing laws would do when we are dealing with a disease that is carried in every line of Dobermans and is probably made up on dozens of genes. I'm sorry if many of the breeders you have talked to are not honest about the disease, I would tell you that you need to talk to a better quality of breeders. As in many things, there are plenty of dishonest people out there that will tell you what they think you want to hear. I would not consider any of those people to be reputable breeders. I've only bred 3 litters so far in my 26+ years in this breed. I've done all the testing, but still explain to every buyer the reality of DCM in this breed. I tell every buyer that 50% of Dobermans will die of heart related disease, and it could be at age 11+ or it could be at 4. I do the testing and try to avoid DCM close up in the pedigree - but no breeder can avoid it altogether. I candidly tell every potential buyer that if they 100% don't want to risk DCM, then they need to find a different breed. That is the reality in the breed I love. I keep in touch with everyone and am always available. No matter what we do, dogs die.... and too many Dobermans die of DCM. It's the reality we all live with. In my 26 years with this breed, there has been a ton of discussion, tons of testing, and tons of research into the disease. The progress that has been made is mostly in having the tools available to diagnose the disease earlier and extending their life with medication. Testing also removes dogs that have occult DCM from the breeding pool - but diagnoses unfortunately does not usually raise its head till the age of 6-8.... long after the optimum age to breed a dog. Good breeders are already making the sacrifices you seem to think we need to make. Imagine spending the thousands of dollars it takes to show a dog to its championship only to find out there is a health issue that will keep you from breeding that dog. Good breeders are never in it for the money - indeed, showing and breeding dogs as a hobby is a money pit.
I'm just really at a loss as to what you expect from the people on this list. The vast majority of them do not breed, and those of us who do are pretty much doing everything that can be done to lessen the chances of DCM already..... while realizing that we can't eradicate it.
06-12-2019 10:31 AM
MeadowCat
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskdobie View Post
But again the scientific record has stated that several genes are associated with the disease so one would have to wonder if the test is really that accurate for North American lines as well. Can anyone provide more information on the test mentioned briefly and its accuracy? If as a breeder you incorporate European lines into your breeding program, does the test no longer work?
Only 2 genes have been identified that can be tested for, and they are currently not really "predictive" of DCM in the sense that testing for them does not tell you whether your dog will develop the disease or not (American OR European).

Dogs can have neither gene, and still get DCM. They can have one gene, and get it. They have have both genes and get it. They have have also have both genes, and NOT get it. We have a VERY complex disease that probably involved many genes with incomplete penetrance. We only have a tiny piece of the puzzle.

Researchers so far have also determined that it seems the genes are different in the North American dogs and the European dogs. Again, since the gene tests at this point are more for research purposes than they are for diagnostic decisions (and, I'm not sure how helpful they are for breeding decisions - I'm not a breeder), I'm not sure it's terribly relevant. Certainly, if I were a breeder of European Dobermans I wouldn't be using the gene tests as a decision maker, but I wouldn't be doing that anyway...

You can find quite a few academic articles on the gene tests if you look for them. One is here and specifically discusses the difference in Euro/American: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4380154/

This is a pretty good write up of some early response to the gene testing: http://www.utahdobes.org/dcm_dna_test.htm

And, the forum has a sticky of a bunch of DCM threads, too - go to the top of the health forum to the stickies.
06-11-2019 04:30 PM
Saskdobie
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenroberto View Post
Here is a professionally produced documentary that delves deeply into DCM, with extended interviews at University of Munich. I was shocked to learn that as many as 58% of all Dobermans die from DCM and that breeders are doing essentially nothing to stop it. This video is well worth watching, for all Doberman owners, not just those who have lost dogs to DCM. This is the link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mL4wuv26068
Today was my first time watching that video and I found some of Steven's conclusions faulty--eye of the beholder and all that. The members/breeders of the DV were the ones that demanded that a study be done. From the timing, I would assume it would have been happening a few years after the results from the Munich clinic were being published which also clearly gathered its data over several years. However, breeders are not scientists. Chances are lack of funding is what lead to the study ending after 3 years--science is expensive, and from the documentary's description the study was not well designed. Also the decision to 'restart' the study in Italy was portrayed as "suspicious" and/or a delaying tactic on par with similar decisions in the past in other fields to delay acknowledging and dealing with a problem (aka big tobacco). But the decision could have been made to independently verify the results obtained at Munich which is quite common. And to give the organizations involved time to decide how to deal with the disease.

It's pretty clear based upon those interviewed that the desire to improve the health of the breed started with responsible breeders who wanted to know why their dogs were dropping dead. And that the current rate of testing (aka those participating by getting their dogs cardio and DNA-tested) is also being driven by breeders since your average 'I want a puppy!' buyer has no idea what health testing they should be looking for. The video does NOT conclude that breeders are doing nothing to stop it since the breeders that were interviewed that provide about a third of the footage were clearly very active and putting a lot of work into cardio testing. Basically they seemed like the European equivalent of MaryandDobes.

Also I haven't got a North American pedigreed dobe, but there are at least three European databases where breeders can enter their pedigrees including titles earned, age attained and cause of death for at least 3 generations. If you're buying a car, you should at a minimum research the model and year to find out if there's any issues. At least as much effort should go into researching a puppy's breed and pedigree so you have an idea of what you're getting into. Pedigrees also provide an insight into how much time and effort have been invested in the dam/sire and/or grandam/grandsire. Titles provide an insight into the dog's potential energy levels/intelligence/conformation. I purchased a registered 2 year old European dobe six months ago. A search of her pedigree shows several of her ancestors had BH/IPO ratings. A little more research into those titles shows she comes from very bright, active working dogs which explains a lot about her energy levels and temperament. It also shows her sire died at 7 years 6 months from pancreatic and kidney failure so yearly blood tests to monitor her pancreatic/kidney function might be a good idea.

Dobermann Brat.Ru - Index
https://doberbase.ru/
- World Pedigree DataBase Dobermann, Dobermann Pedigree DataBase.

I'm not sure what the equivalent North American websites are, but responsible breeders clearly are trying to be honest about their lines and exchange information to improve the breed.
06-11-2019 02:06 PM
Saskdobie
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenroberto View Post
I did not say all, I said most. Which is generalizing. Yes. And from my experience, correctly so. The fact that the incidence of DCM is at 50% or above over decades is proof on its face that most breeders are not doing their part in testing, and that buyers are being told 10% is the actual rate. Anyone making a 1000 dollar investment in a pet would respond differently when given the probabilities of 10% vs. 50%+. That seems obvious. Buyers accept dobes with no testing because they are being told 10%, which is a probability they can live with going into the commitment. So, I stand by my comment but acknowledge you are a notable and praiseworthy exception.
Firstly, thank you for linking that video. It's good to see doberman owners and veterinarians working together to educate people about the disease and about what the testing actually means.

That being said, all this information has been available on the internet for some time. Our red female was diagnosed with DCM back in September of 2015. She had the second version the documentary spoke about where she was first diagnosed after she had extreme problems breathing because her lungs had begun to fill with fluid. She actually lived for 2.5 years after being diagnosed. Yes, the drug regimen was expensive. And yes, it was very hard to watch. But there were already multiple websites stating that 50% of the breed was affected and that the average life span was 7.5 years.

You also have to keep in mind how rapidly the technology to detect and diagnose the disease is improving. When my aunt was a breeder back in the 1990s, the euphemism was that 'the breed burns brightly'. There weren't a lot of heart studies then but the average accepted lifespan was around 7. If you dog lasted for longer than that, you were lucky. Breeders weren't stupid or greedy, there just weren't a lot of tools available to them. And as posted in this thread, as a breeder you could try to breed for longevity and sometimes the next generation were still affected.

I personally found the info about the genetic test offered in North America not working on European lines a bit confusing since from the documentary's data, the rates of DCM seem to be pretty consistent worldwide. But again the scientific record has stated that several genes are associated with the disease so one would have to wonder if the test is really that accurate for North American lines as well. Can anyone provide more information on the test mentioned briefly and its accuracy? If as a breeder you incorporate European lines into your breeding program, does the test no longer work?
06-06-2019 07:02 AM
falnfenix
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryAndDobes View Post
Another newsflash ... just because it's a documentary doesn't mean it is truth.
what's that? BIAS in my documentaries?! UNPOSSIBLE.
06-06-2019 04:31 AM
LadyDi Stevenroberto:

Check out the thread running within this forum titled ...”Multiple females in the Household” .
Make sure you start at the beginning of the thread so you can understand the goals of this person that wants to begin breeding dobermans.
Personally I have always “thought it would be fun to breed dobermans” but through this forum I have learned dreams are not always reality.
It’s hard work with no guarantees.
Your efforts are needed on that thread .....check it out ... in the name of creating awareness ....this person might learn from your experiences.
Give it a go.........
The folks you are writing with on this thread are very experienced and reputable breeders. So awareness is already established.
Please help us out with the other thread .....as we are all trying to create awareness with this member.
06-05-2019 11:57 PM
Fitzmar Dobermans
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenroberto View Post
Please do not be condesending; I understand the disease well. The fact that someone does not agree with you does not make them stupid, except perhaps in your own mind. I am not seeking a solution, I am seeking progress in getting that probability down to the 10% that 70 per cent of the breeders I have spoken with in USA, S America, Asia, and Europe have ALL assured me is true, when in fact it is not. Neither am I angry; I am trying to raise awareness and create discussion. Progress will come with sacrafice on the part of breeders and increased efforts. Probably also laws being passed. I dont see any of that happening except on an ad hoc basis, and that is my point.
You think I was being condescending?? I respectfully will tell you that I'm not. Maybe there is a language barrier in the translation, and as my spanish is poor, I can't help that.
I can also tell you that I don't know what help passing laws would do when we are dealing with a disease that is carried in every line of Dobermans and is probably made up on dozens of genes. I'm sorry if many of the breeders you have talked to are not honest about the disease, I would tell you that you need to talk to a better quality of breeders. As in many things, there are plenty of dishonest people out there that will tell you what they think you want to hear. I would not consider any of those people to be reputable breeders. I've only bred 3 litters so far in my 26+ years in this breed. I've done all the testing, but still explain to every buyer the reality of DCM in this breed. I tell every buyer that 50% of Dobermans will die of heart related disease, and it could be at age 11+ or it could be at 4. I do the testing and try to avoid DCM close up in the pedigree - but no breeder can avoid it altogether. I candidly tell every potential buyer that if they 100% don't want to risk DCM, then they need to find a different breed. That is the reality in the breed I love. I keep in touch with everyone and am always available. No matter what we do, dogs die.... and too many Dobermans die of DCM. It's the reality we all live with. In my 26 years with this breed, there has been a ton of discussion, tons of testing, and tons of research into the disease. The progress that has been made is mostly in having the tools available to diagnose the disease earlier and extending their life with medication. Testing also removes dogs that have occult DCM from the breeding pool - but diagnoses unfortunately does not usually raise its head till the age of 6-8.... long after the optimum age to breed a dog. Good breeders are already making the sacrifices you seem to think we need to make. Imagine spending the thousands of dollars it takes to show a dog to its championship only to find out there is a health issue that will keep you from breeding that dog. Good breeders are never in it for the money - indeed, showing and breeding dogs as a hobby is a money pit.
I'm just really at a loss as to what you expect from the people on this list. The vast majority of them do not breed, and those of us who do are pretty much doing everything that can be done to lessen the chances of DCM already..... while realizing that we can't eradicate it.
06-05-2019 09:10 PM
4x4bike ped I have said this many times, but I will reiterate. What one pays initially for a puppy from a litter, well bred, from a decent and well known breeder is a drop in the bucket with respect to expenditures one might expect over the lifetime of the dog.

My youngest is the joy of my life. Except for typical puppy things, he has never been sick a day in his life. His temperament is perfect for me. He is the 3rd dog we have gotten from the same breeder.

I wanted a pup sometime in the summer of 2015. 2 days before Thanksgiving 2014, I got a call from Michelle saying that a committed buyer had to back out because of unforeseen circumstances. Did I want the pup? I was thrilled. I knew the litter (Jewellia x Raden). I said YES! The only caveat was that I had to drive down to Southern Oregon and pick him up within about 36 hours. Hopped in the truck and met her the following morning. What a wonderful experience. I was actually able to assist her in removing McCoy's stitches. I got a chance to see all the kids pig piling and going crazy. Fun!

So McCoy was $2500. I didn't blink an eye. I have already talked to her about my next Dobe. We don't ever talk price. Just my needs and her comfort with selling me another Doberman. I expect to pay about $3000-$3500. Perfect....Whatever...

Edit to say: If you want a potentially healthy happy pup, do your research and don't scrimp on the front end.

JMO
John
Portland OR
06-05-2019 07:34 PM
MaryAndDobes
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenroberto View Post
It is not a movie, it is a documentary. And it corresponds to my own personal experience in SE Asia, Europe, North and South America. What has changed in the past six years since the documentary? I would say, not much. The fact that the incidence of DCM is at 50% or above over decades is proof on its face that most breeders are not doing their part in testing, and that buyers are being told 10% is the actual rate. Anyone making a 1000 dollar investment in a pet would respond differently when given the probabilities of 10% vs. 50%+. That seems obvious. Buyers accept dobes with no testing because they are being told 10%, which is a probability they can live with going into the commitment. So, I stand by my comment but acknowledge you are an exception.
What seems obvious to me is, first of all, that Dobermans are much more than $1000 investments when you buy from responsible breeders, so perhaps that is part of your misconception. If you're talking to breeders who charge $1000 for their dogs, you're right, they probably aren't doing their part in testing and telling.

I live in a world where I pay much more than that for responsibly bred Dobermans, and I deal with breeders that are realistic about the problem we face and tell the truth about it. They test and they tell. And I don't have any problem finding them. I'm sorry your reality has been different? But you seem to be on a mandate to educate us here about something we ALREADY know.
06-05-2019 06:21 PM
greenkouki What breeders have you spoken to that affirm your assertion about deaths/percentages? I asked this before.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenroberto View Post
I am seeking progress in getting that probability down to the 10% that 70 per cent of the breeders I have spoken with in USA, S America, Asia, and Europe have ALL assured me is true, when in fact it is not. t.
06-05-2019 06:20 PM
alan j. While laws are being passed to end Heart Disease in dogs , i hope they add a rider for the cure of cancer in them at the same time!
06-05-2019 05:40 PM
stevenroberto anything in the documentary you would care to refute as false with a citation, I will be happy to look at it. otherwise, it is an inconvenient truth, to you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by spocksdad View Post
(e.g. "an inconvenient truth"...)
06-05-2019 05:36 PM
stevenroberto Please do not be condesending; I understand the disease well. The fact that someone does not agree with you does not make them stupid, except perhaps in your own mind. I am not seeking a solution, I am seeking progress in getting that probability down to the 10% that 70 per cent of the breeders I have spoken with in USA, S America, Asia, and Europe have ALL assured me is true, when in fact it is not. Neither am I angry; I am trying to raise awareness and create discussion. Progress will come with sacrafice on the part of breeders and increased efforts. Probably also laws being passed. I dont see any of that happening except on an ad hoc basis, and that is my point.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fitzmar Dobermans View Post
This ^^^^^^^^^^^^

My first well bred Doberman had all 4 grandparents live to 12 + years. My girl was enrolled in a DCM study at Univ. of Pennsylvania Vet school: they could never use her in the study because her her Cardiac Ultrasounds were always healthy. She dropped dead at 9 years and 3 months of age, and in her litter of 8, was the ONLY one to even make it to the age of 9. Heart disease in Dobermans can be totally unpredictable. We test and we study pedigrees, but it is no guarantee that the resulting puppies will be free from DCM.

I get that you (the original poster) are angry. However, lashing out at breeders when you really don't understand the disease is not going to help. There are no easy answers - we all wish that there were.
05-29-2019 06:24 AM
spocksdad
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryAndDobes View Post
Another newsflash ... just because it's a documentary doesn't mean it is truth.
(e.g. "an inconvenient truth"...)
05-29-2019 04:07 AM
LadyDi Nice post John........experience speaks!!
05-28-2019 11:13 PM
4x4bike ped Our only dog who died from DCM related causes (V-tach/Sudden Death syndrome) came from a very reputable breeder who seriously health tests her sire and dam prospects to the nth degree. This includes complete cardio via 24hr Holter and Echo.

Still... When one thinks of the age that these dogs are bred, what are the chances of predicting DCM regardless of the clear bill of health given at 2 or 3 years old?

My current youngest had a full cardio workup at 3 yo. His cardiologist said that all looked very good, but that I should bring him back at 5 yo as that is a better age for preliminary diagnosis of heart disease. That is what will happen. Very soon.

If we eliminated all breeding between Dobermans unless they had no DCM related occurrences in their pedigree, there would be no Dobermans.

I personally prefer to look for longevity in a pedigree. My McCoy has a good chance at a long life. His mother is doing well and his grandfather (bug's Toad) is 13. His sire died from unrelated causes (bloat).

If he is diagnosed with DCM and caught early, the possibilities of a reasonable life have been greatly improved.

Our boy who came minutes from death with his initial episode of SDS, recovered and with a med regime, lived to be a senior. He did eventually succumb to DCM. But it was quick and seemingly painless. This was 7 years ago.

DCM is a fact of life in this breed.

Prepare for it

Research your prospective breeder. Research your potential pups pedigree. .

Get a very good vet whom you trust who is very familiar with Dobermans.

Test your dog regularly as recommended by your vet or someone who is very knowledgeable about this breed.

Obtain and maintain quality pet health insurance.

OK... Done ranting
JMO
John
Portland OR
05-28-2019 09:43 PM
MaryAndDobes Another newsflash ... just because it's a documentary doesn't mean it is truth.
05-28-2019 01:02 PM
Artemis
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fitzmar Dobermans View Post
This ^^^^^^^^^^^^

My first well bred Doberman had all 4 grandparents live to 12 + years. My girl was enrolled in a DCM study at Univ. of Pennsylvania Vet school: they could never use her in the study because her her Cardiac Ultrasounds were always healthy. She dropped dead at 9 years and 3 months of age, and in her litter of 8, was the ONLY one to even make it to the age of 9. Heart disease in Dobermans can be totally unpredictable. We test and we study pedigrees, but it is no guarantee that the resulting puppies will be free from DCM.

I get that you (the original poster) are angry. However, lashing out at breeders when you really don't understand the disease is not going to help. There are no easy answers - we all wish that there were.
I'm thirding this! My girl's aforementioned grandsire had 3 out of 4 grandparents die of DCM... except they died of it at ages like 12 and 13. Both his parents made it near or to the age of 10 and even had a Bred for Longevity certification. How the heck are you supposed to avoid that? And do you toss a dog from the gene pool that lived to 13 because they happened to get DCM at a very advanced age? Keeping in mind each time a dog is removed from the gene pool, the gene pool shrinks, the inbreeding increases and who knows what terrible disease might appear next. I recall reading from a Boxer breeder that two prior instances of diseases in the breed that breeders successfully tried to eliminate this way in Boxers is eventually what led to the appearance and uptick of Boxer Cardiomyopathy to the point it is as bad for them as DCM is for us

What I believe OP is failing to understand is that it is a terribly complex disease and even breeders doing their absolute best will still lose dogs to DCM. Because DCM is not predictable like a simple recessive or dominant genetic status you cannot know if a dog will develop DCM later, and unfortunately bitches have a limited window as to when they can safely be bred for the first time.

What OP is also neglecting to realise is although breeders have maybe unintentionally or unknowingly exacerbated the problem with liberal linebreeding (especially in Europe) and popular sire syndrome, the breed has also experienced extreme and severe bottlenecks due to outside circumstances (such as war) and therefore not always precipitated by breeders. This is a whack a mole problem - and it's also a disease you need at least a decade to assess the overall progression within the breed. Another thing to consider: how much have the number of actual cases increased vs the number of reported cases?

I believe there is a mixture of both, but to say that the rate is this high because breeders are doing nothing actually infuriates me knowing how hard breeders are working and doing their best at making judicious mating decisions. Not every show line breeder is chasing Top 20 rankings at the expense of health and longevity.
05-28-2019 12:33 PM
Fitzmar Dobermans
Quote:
Originally Posted by MeadowCat View Post
You're just simply incorrect. Testing alone isn't going to solve the problem, because DCM is a complex condition. Simply testing breeding stock doesn't mean we'll end up with no DCM. Testing plus carefully studying pedigrees doesn't mean we'll end up with no DCM, although that is currently a good route to go. When you have a really complex disease with many (hundreds) of genes involved, potentially also involving things like diet, environment, etc etc etc...there's no easy solution.

I understand that you want a clear solution, but there isn't one. It's not a disease like von Willebrands, where you could, if you so chose, breed only clear or carrier to clear to produce no affected dogs (and even then, you have to consider the cost to the gene pool, and there's ample room for discussion there). With DCM, there is no way to do this - we do not have those answers.

Truly, you need to better understand this disease. I get that you're angry and sad that you lost your dogs. Many many people in the breed have. But you aren't understanding this disease at all if you think there's an easy answer to solving it.
This ^^^^^^^^^^^^

My first well bred Doberman had all 4 grandparents live to 12 + years. My girl was enrolled in a DCM study at Univ. of Pennsylvania Vet school: they could never use her in the study because her her Cardiac Ultrasounds were always healthy. She dropped dead at 9 years and 3 months of age, and in her litter of 8, was the ONLY one to even make it to the age of 9. Heart disease in Dobermans can be totally unpredictable. We test and we study pedigrees, but it is no guarantee that the resulting puppies will be free from DCM.

I get that you (the original poster) are angry. However, lashing out at breeders when you really don't understand the disease is not going to help. There are no easy answers - we all wish that there were.
05-28-2019 11:35 AM
MeadowCat
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenroberto View Post
The fact that the incidence of DCM is at 50% or above over decades is proof on its face that most breeders are not doing their part in testing, and that buyers are being told 10% is the actual rate. Anyone making a 1000 dollar investment in a pet would respond differently when given the probabilities of 10% vs. 50%+. That seems obvious. Buyers accept dobes with no testing because they are being told 10%, which is a probability they can live with going into the commitment. So, I stand by my comment but acknowledge you are an expert and an exception.
You're just simply incorrect. Testing alone isn't going to solve the problem, because DCM is a complex condition. Simply testing breeding stock doesn't mean we'll end up with no DCM. Testing plus carefully studying pedigrees doesn't mean we'll end up with no DCM, although that is currently a good route to go. When you have a really complex disease with many (hundreds) of genes involved, potentially also involving things like diet, environment, etc etc etc...there's no easy solution.

I understand that you want a clear solution, but there isn't one. It's not a disease like von Willebrands, where you could, if you so chose, breed only clear or carrier to clear to produce no affected dogs (and even then, you have to consider the cost to the gene pool, and there's ample room for discussion there). With DCM, there is no way to do this - we do not have those answers.

Truly, you need to better understand this disease. I get that you're angry and sad that you lost your dogs. Many many people in the breed have. But you aren't understanding this disease at all if you think there's an easy answer to solving it.
05-28-2019 11:14 AM
brw1982 If the majority of your experience is that breeders are in denial and/or ignoring the problem of DCM in the breed, I would urge you to elevate your personal standards for who you're willing to associate with in the breed.

Because what you're describing is the actions and behavior of sh*t breeders, not all breeders and certainly not good ones (of which there are MANY).
05-28-2019 11:00 AM
stevenroberto It is not a movie, it is a documentary. And it corresponds to my own personal experience in SE Asia, Europe, North and South America. What has changed in the past six years since the documentary? I would say, not much. The fact that the incidence of DCM is at 50% or above over decades is proof on its face that most breeders are not doing their part in testing, and that buyers are being told 10% is the actual rate. Anyone making a 1000 dollar investment in a pet would respond differently when given the probabilities of 10% vs. 50%+. That seems obvious. Buyers accept dobes with no testing because they are being told 10%, which is a probability they can live with going into the commitment. So, I stand by my comment but acknowledge you are an exception.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryAndDobes View Post
How can you stand by a generalization? From one movie? Have you actually talked with any Doberman breeders?

I mean, I'm a breeder. My Dobermans were all in the Doberman cardiac study at the U of Guelph in Ontario, Canada from 1985 until it ended last year, so my own personal dogs through those years (Rebel, Sadie, Ember, Wish, Wonder, Rory, Karma, Zeke, Rocket, Kizzy, Shelby, Royal, Moxie, Copper, Wicca) ALL went every year until they died (unless I deemed them not well enough for the trip like when they were 12, for eg. They had their regular cardiac ultrasounds and ecgs there, and any other experimental testing they were doing like when they were developing the troponin test. I was pretty rabid about urging my local puppy owners to take part as well so Henna, Dionne, Taz, Jessie, Farah, Bentley, Sammy, Blush, Maya, Jax and Lola were also taking part. When I moved to Kentucky, I drove 10 hours back with my eldest Dobermans so that they didn't miss their cardiac exams! My most recent cardiac exams were on Moxie, who is nearly 12 (not exactly young so that I can hide symptoms!) and Wicca. I used to Holter 15-20 Dobermans for the Guelph study back in the day, and then later purchased my own so that I could offer it to my puppy owners as well as use it myself. It's been shipped to New Brunswick for Rusty, it's been out to Minnesota for Richter, I drove 2 hours today to get it back from where I sent it for Jax. When the PDK4 test became available, I tested all of my own personal Dobermans, and informed my owners about the test - a few tested. I will be honest that I have only tested the youngest one for the dcm2 DNA test, though. I didn't really see the point of doing it on my 10+ year olds when the test came out. Seemed they were already beating the odds, knock on wood.

I usually offer in conversations about dcm that "upwards of 55% of Dobermans acquire dcm". That is my usual quote. No whitewashing there. I didn't pick that figure up out of thin air. It's what I hear other breeders saying, too.
05-28-2019 10:58 AM
stevenroberto I did not say all, I said most. Which is generalizing. Yes. And from my experience, correctly so. The fact that the incidence of DCM is at 50% or above over decades is proof on its face that most breeders are not doing their part in testing, and that buyers are being told 10% is the actual rate. Anyone making a 1000 dollar investment in a pet would respond differently when given the probabilities of 10% vs. 50%+. That seems obvious. Buyers accept dobes with no testing because they are being told 10%, which is a probability they can live with going into the commitment. So, I stand by my comment but acknowledge you are a notable and praiseworthy exception.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Artemis View Post
Yeah, it is definitely not the case for reputable breeder in North America. Even those who don't actually test but are supposedly reputable will readily say "around half of dobermans will develop DCM".

I'm not a breeder, (not yet anyway) but I had my girl holtered for the first time at 3 last december, and her first echo at 4 this past March, and I intend on continuing to holter yearly if not twice yearly since I'm lucky enough to have a friend who bought a Holter I can use. I will also try to echo yearly because I think that information is important. I've also tested my bitch for the PDK4 and the DCM2 and am sharing that information with the various projects looking at the genetic diversity and longevity in the breed, as well as trying to keep them UTD on her Holter and Echo reports.

I also think as a matter of principle it's important for that information to be out there for anyone that might be researching her lines or those of close relatives.

I keep trying to coax her littermate's owner into getting him tested especially because their grandsire (direct paternal sire) died suddenly of DCM at age 7, and early detection is the best shot, as well as once again being relevant to pedigree research, genetic research and information.

Knowledge is power, and the ethical preservation breeders don't shy away from that. But it's a little bit more across the board in Europe. A European (who has two bitches from American lines) recently told me that in Europe many people think American dobes are less healthy because we North Americans health test so much (they figure we do more testing because our dogs are more sickly... I don't understand that sort of backwards thinking, healthy or not why wouldn't you want the most information possible?). But even so it does a disservice to generalise and say all breeders or all european breeders think this way.
05-28-2019 10:54 AM
stevenroberto The fact that the incidence of DCM is at 50% or above over decades is proof on its face that most breeders are not doing their part in testing, and that buyers are being told 10% is the actual rate. Anyone making a 1000 dollar investment in a pet would respond differently when given the probabilities of 10% vs. 50%+. That seems obvious. Buyers accept dobes with no testing because they are being told 10%, which is a probability they can live with going into the commitment. So, I stand by my comment but acknowledge you are an expert and an exception.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MeadowCat View Post
Not only do you seem woefully uninformed about breeders, but heck, a LOT of good owners are also well informed and doing regular testing, too.

I test both of my dogs with an echo and 24 hour holter exam every year, and report their results both publicly (on Dobequest) as well as to their breeders, so they have that information for their breeding programs so they can make the best possible decisions going forward.

Maybe a forum in your own area of the world would be the place to "educate" people, but you may want to be sure you have correct information first.
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