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post #1 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-21-2010, 05:00 PM Thread Starter
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Doberman's and Bulldogs?

1ST OFF - I AM NOT PLANNING ON DOING THIS ANY TIME SOON - I'M JUST COMING TO THE EXPERTS TO INQUIRE

OK - So, I'm wondering if anyone here has a doberman AND a bulldog? I've recently started doing some research (lightly) and I'm falling in love with the chunky little guys.

I already own Magnum - who's 8 months old today - but the boyfriend and I were looking into a bulldog as a possibility when Magnum is about 2 years old.

Any thoughts? Any people currently own one? Any thoughts on breeders or good literature I could pick up?
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post #2 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-21-2010, 05:38 PM
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Basic Care for Your Bulldog

One of my vets used to breed/show Bulldogs and French Bulldogs in AKC and was active in breed rescue. Important to know: your Bullie's vet must know how to anesthetize Bullies properly.

What I've learned from owning a Bullie (Boston-APBT mix): they snore, my doG, they snore!
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post #3 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-21-2010, 07:08 PM
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they are one of the most expensive breeds for vetting....

do alot of research, they have alot of health issue's...
my daughter is a vet tech, and they have alot of clients with bulldogs..
that's all i know...
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post #4 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-21-2010, 07:15 PM
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my vet has a bulldog - cute as hell. Sam loves him. They play while he's waiting to see the doc. He snorts a lot. I'm sure he snores like mad

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post #5 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-21-2010, 08:45 PM
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I'm not sure how active you are, but I don't think a bulldog could run, bike, or hike with you if you enjoy those activities.

They are cute though! Talk about polar opposite body type, too, LOL...

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post #6 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-21-2010, 08:46 PM
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Like someone already said make sure you do your research on bulldogs. They do have lots of health issues and are high maintenance. They are prone to breathing problems, you have to wipe clean the wrinkles on their face, and since they can't clean themselves you have to clean their bum ( i mention this bc some ppl wont want to do this )just to name a few. They are very very very cute and an awesome dog. They are very expensive tho
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post #7 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-22-2010, 05:07 AM
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Many years ago, I called an English Bulldog breeder just to ask a few questions and get some general information. She asked me if I was prepared to spend up to $5000 in vet bills over the years, and she began to explain the host of health problems they commonly have. If people think Dobes have health issues, a bulldog is pretty much the king of health problems.

I love the look of bulldogs, but they really are just a ton of money to keep, not to mention, they are not a dog that you can take on long walks or take on vacation somewhere that is warm. Most cannot even tolerate a medium pace walk in 80 degrees, let alone any warmer. I know they have that cute bulldog face, but they really are what some call genetically mutated just to get that look. They are a far cry from the bulldogs of many years ago. Now they are much shorter, wider, and sound like they are going to die of exhaustion after a 5 minute walk. My friend has one, and he's cute, but no thanks. I'll stick with my Doberman any day!
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post #8 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-22-2010, 08:22 AM
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I fostered a bulldog for awhile. He was very, very sweet but had a ton of health issues and their play style is very bully-ish. For me though, the biggest issue would be that their exercise capabilities, especially in warm weather, are super limited. I had to do 2 separate dog acitivites each day, which is a lot of work!
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post #9 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-22-2010, 09:06 AM
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talking about warm weather, that's where I come from.

My friend "had" a bull dog kennel, imported from Thailand to Vietnam. Gosh, they are so cute when they were small, and healthy.
first problem is their skins, prone to litterally anything: dirt, food, humid, water, and their own saliva! My friend had to wipe them off twice or 3 times a day to keep them clean but their skin was horrible. I can't even start to describe it.
second is they have trouble with breathing in a hot and humid weather. They're easily get tired, but it 10 times more when it's hot, and when it's humid. AC all for their kennel all day.
three, it's a nightmare and huge risk when you breed them. Their body was changed (genetically) so that delivering baby naturally is not an option. 100% you have to do the C-section.

Not try to scare you off, but it costed fortune out of my friend before he gave up and switch to Rottweiler. And thanks to that my boy has lot of cute and active playmates to romp with.

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post #10 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-22-2010, 09:29 AM
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First, I don't know what type of bulldog you are interested in, but I will assume it's English or French? My daughter has two EB's and they are not very compatible with my dogs. Personality wise there is no problem, they are adorable tho they can be bossy, it's the physical incompatibilty, the bulldogs can't keep up, they sleep alot more, they can't take the outside excercise....
so if you do alot of activities with your doberman the bulldog will end up being left out......and yes, they spend alot of time at the vets....skin problems mostly.



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post #11 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-22-2010, 09:45 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the great advice people!!

I knew a little of these breathing problems, but I guess I haven't found the right places yet, because I wasn't aware of all the skin issues.

Again - just doing some minor start up research to see if the breed would possible be compatible with my family. Thanks for all the information!!
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post #12 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-22-2010, 11:27 AM
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A friend of mine has an English Bull Dog and while I love her, she is pretty dominate and kind of lazy. She is not a good match for either my Dobe or my Boston Terriers. I suppose they can all be different and of course, it depends on what you are looking for. My BTs do well with my Doberman and they do not snore unless they are VERY tired after a long hike or workout. If you do decided to get a dog of the brachial breed, be sure to get it from a responsible breeder that health tests. I will add that if I was a one dog household, I would definitely love to have one. ;o)

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post #13 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-22-2010, 12:19 PM
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I've taken care of a few. I would say it's a rather odd choice for a person that already has a dobe.

Where to start...
They can only be born by C-section as they have been bred to such un-naturally large heads so be prepared to pay as much as $5000 just to have one. Usually there is only one or two puppies in a litter.

Your vet must be familiar and experienced with the breed, they can be very sensitive to meds otherwise harmless to other dogs.

Be prepared to deal with health problems. A healthy english bulldog is almost an oxymoron. You will be a frequent returning customer at your vet's and as such make sure you have enough money set aside to afford all those vet bills.

Most common are skin problems. All those skin folds trap moisture and bacteria, they need to be thoroughly cleaned and dried multiple times in a day. This includes their faces, feet, elbows, you name it. As such they are very prone to all sorts of skin problems, hot spots, fur loss, etc. They drool, and all that drool gets on their legs, and all over their face, again you have to keep that skin dry. Even when you do clean them regularly, they can smell. I've met some that had stinky greasy skin/fur but could not be bathed because they would have an explosion of hot spots.

If you've never lived with a drooly dog before, make sure it is positively something you could handle. We're talking globs of sticky drooly mess splattered on your walls, tv, ceiling, smothered across the side of your bed and couches, your clothes, your car.. It gets every where and there is no way to prevent it. You just have to deal with it. They also shed short little prickly hairs that stick to every thing and imbed themselves in to any fabric. And since they're mostly white, you can see that hair on just about every thing.

They can be extremely stubborn. Extremely! Going on a walk with one can be like trying to walk a speeding bowling ball one minute and like trying to drag a boat anchor another. Some can become aggressive so training and propers socialization are very important. Especially since you will be dealing with what is a powerful and large (even though they're short) stubborn and head strong adult.

They tend to play by throwing their bodies into things, furniture, people, other dogs, they're very much body slammers and while it's cute to watch when they're puppies, it's no fun when they're a 60lb adult with all that body mass being that short and compact.

They can't handle heat well at all and they can have problems breathing even when the weather is fine.

Beyond that.. they are clowns, they are affectionate and dedicated to their family. They can be great pets, but a lot of people I know who used to have one refuse to get another one because it can be so painful to watch your beloved dog suffer as much as some bulldogs do due to all their health issues. Plus their life spans aren't any thing to brag about either. To be honest, they're wonderful dogs and every one I have met and taken care of have been sweet and funny, but I always get sad thinking about them. To me that breed is a prime example of what people have done to dogs in the name of unrealistic conformation at the price of suffering of those dogs.

The french bulldogs are a smaller and are much healthier as a breed. They are very similar personality wise, funny, devoted, still stubborn, but they have more spunk and are much more lively. You could also consider an american bulldog or old english bulldog, which are again similar in personality, but are taller, healthier, not as grotesque. Those two are more like what the english bulldogs used to be when they were working dogs, before conformation became more important then functionality.

One thing you have to be aware of with ANY bully breed is that they are known to having a tendency to become dog aggressive, even when raised with your dobe from puppy hood you could still have issues if you're not careful.

English Bulldog:


French Bulldog:


American Bulldog:


Old English Bulldogge


Bulldogbreeds.com would be a good site for you to visit.

Last edited by Zucker; 10-22-2010 at 12:25 PM.
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post #14 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-22-2010, 12:26 PM
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English bulldogs are great characters but they are the absolute worst bred dogs on the planet. Breathing problems, mobility problems, eye problems, jaw problems, skin problems, digestive system problems. It just makes you weep, what's been done to this wonderful ancient breed.
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post #15 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-22-2010, 02:50 PM
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I have a friend here in the UK with an English Bulldog. He paid 1,500 for him and has spent 5,000 on vet bills so far. The dog loves a romp on the beach, is good with other dogs and people and can't walk far in the sun. Ye I have seen a video on YT recently of a Bullie doing schutzhund and he was good. I've also seen video's of Bullies skateboarding so do a lot of research and if you really want one go to a very experienced long time breeder and ask to see all of the dogs in the kennel especially the old dogs.....if they have any
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post #16 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-22-2010, 04:51 PM Thread Starter
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Wow - I don't even know what to say!

Thank you so much for all the GREAT information!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zucker View Post
I've taken care of a few. I would say it's a rather odd choice for a person that already has a dobe.

Where to start...
They can only be born by C-section as they have been bred to such un-naturally large heads so be prepared to pay as much as $5000 just to have one. Usually there is only one or two puppies in a litter.

Your vet must be familiar and experienced with the breed, they can be very sensitive to meds otherwise harmless to other dogs.

Be prepared to deal with health problems. A healthy english bulldog is almost an oxymoron. You will be a frequent returning customer at your vet's and as such make sure you have enough money set aside to afford all those vet bills.

Most common are skin problems. All those skin folds trap moisture and bacteria, they need to be thoroughly cleaned and dried multiple times in a day. This includes their faces, feet, elbows, you name it. As such they are very prone to all sorts of skin problems, hot spots, fur loss, etc. They drool, and all that drool gets on their legs, and all over their face, again you have to keep that skin dry. Even when you do clean them regularly, they can smell. I've met some that had stinky greasy skin/fur but could not be bathed because they would have an explosion of hot spots.

If you've never lived with a drooly dog before, make sure it is positively something you could handle. We're talking globs of sticky drooly mess splattered on your walls, tv, ceiling, smothered across the side of your bed and couches, your clothes, your car.. It gets every where and there is no way to prevent it. You just have to deal with it. They also shed short little prickly hairs that stick to every thing and imbed themselves in to any fabric. And since they're mostly white, you can see that hair on just about every thing.

They can be extremely stubborn. Extremely! Going on a walk with one can be like trying to walk a speeding bowling ball one minute and like trying to drag a boat anchor another. Some can become aggressive so training and propers socialization are very important. Especially since you will be dealing with what is a powerful and large (even though they're short) stubborn and head strong adult.

They tend to play by throwing their bodies into things, furniture, people, other dogs, they're very much body slammers and while it's cute to watch when they're puppies, it's no fun when they're a 60lb adult with all that body mass being that short and compact.

They can't handle heat well at all and they can have problems breathing even when the weather is fine.

Beyond that.. they are clowns, they are affectionate and dedicated to their family. They can be great pets, but a lot of people I know who used to have one refuse to get another one because it can be so painful to watch your beloved dog suffer as much as some bulldogs do due to all their health issues. Plus their life spans aren't any thing to brag about either. To be honest, they're wonderful dogs and every one I have met and taken care of have been sweet and funny, but I always get sad thinking about them. To me that breed is a prime example of what people have done to dogs in the name of unrealistic conformation at the price of suffering of those dogs.

The french bulldogs are a smaller and are much healthier as a breed. They are very similar personality wise, funny, devoted, still stubborn, but they have more spunk and are much more lively. You could also consider an american bulldog or old english bulldog, which are again similar in personality, but are taller, healthier, not as grotesque. Those two are more like what the english bulldogs used to be when they were working dogs, before conformation became more important then functionality.

One thing you have to be aware of with ANY bully breed is that they are known to having a tendency to become dog aggressive, even when raised with your dobe from puppy hood you could still have issues if you're not careful.

English Bulldog:


French Bulldog:


American Bulldog:


Old English Bulldogge


Bulldogbreeds.com would be a good site for you to visit.
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post #17 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-22-2010, 08:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zucker View Post
I've taken care of a few. I would say it's a rather odd choice for a person that already has a dobe.

Where to start...
They can only be born by C-section as they have been bred to such un-naturally large heads so be prepared to pay as much as $5000 just to have one. Usually there is only one or two puppies in a litter.

Your vet must be familiar and experienced with the breed, they can be very sensitive to meds otherwise harmless to other dogs.

Be prepared to deal with health problems. A healthy english bulldog is almost an oxymoron. You will be a frequent returning customer at your vet's and as such make sure you have enough money set aside to afford all those vet bills.

Most common are skin problems. All those skin folds trap moisture and bacteria, they need to be thoroughly cleaned and dried multiple times in a day. This includes their faces, feet, elbows, you name it. As such they are very prone to all sorts of skin problems, hot spots, fur loss, etc. They drool, and all that drool gets on their legs, and all over their face, again you have to keep that skin dry. Even when you do clean them regularly, they can smell. I've met some that had stinky greasy skin/fur but could not be bathed because they would have an explosion of hot spots.

If you've never lived with a drooly dog before, make sure it is positively something you could handle. We're talking globs of sticky drooly mess splattered on your walls, tv, ceiling, smothered across the side of your bed and couches, your clothes, your car.. It gets every where and there is no way to prevent it. You just have to deal with it. They also shed short little prickly hairs that stick to every thing and imbed themselves in to any fabric. And since they're mostly white, you can see that hair on just about every thing.

They can be extremely stubborn. Extremely! Going on a walk with one can be like trying to walk a speeding bowling ball one minute and like trying to drag a boat anchor another. Some can become aggressive so training and propers socialization are very important. Especially since you will be dealing with what is a powerful and large (even though they're short) stubborn and head strong adult.

They tend to play by throwing their bodies into things, furniture, people, other dogs, they're very much body slammers and while it's cute to watch when they're puppies, it's no fun when they're a 60lb adult with all that body mass being that short and compact.

They can't handle heat well at all and they can have problems breathing even when the weather is fine.

Beyond that.. they are clowns, they are affectionate and dedicated to their family. They can be great pets, but a lot of people I know who used to have one refuse to get another one because it can be so painful to watch your beloved dog suffer as much as some bulldogs do due to all their health issues. Plus their life spans aren't any thing to brag about either. To be honest, they're wonderful dogs and every one I have met and taken care of have been sweet and funny, but I always get sad thinking about them. To me that breed is a prime example of what people have done to dogs in the name of unrealistic conformation at the price of suffering of those dogs.

The french bulldogs are a smaller and are much healthier as a breed. They are very similar personality wise, funny, devoted, still stubborn, but they have more spunk and are much more lively. You could also consider an american bulldog or old english bulldog, which are again similar in personality, but are taller, healthier, not as grotesque. Those two are more like what the english bulldogs used to be when they were working dogs, before conformation became more important then functionality.

One thing you have to be aware of with ANY bully breed is that they are known to having a tendency to become dog aggressive, even when raised with your dobe from puppy hood you could still have issues if you're not careful.

English Bulldog:


French Bulldog:


American Bulldog:


Old English Bulldogge


Bulldogbreeds.com would be a good site for you to visit.
That American Bulldog you showed is either Mufassa or Mufassa lines. They are beautiful, but even a lot of American Bulldogs have terrible skin issues as well as heat intolerance. Everything you said is 100% true, and I can say that from 1st hand experience. All of my friends seem to have dogs, and one has an American Bulldog and the other has a French Bulldog. They both are very bullyish in terms of temperament. Now, I will say that my Dobes favorite play partner is a year and a half old American Bulldog. They love each other, and they are both male. That's not very common with bulldog breeds. Most males will not tolerate other males. The American Bulldog is fixed, but my boy isn't. I'm hoping they'll still get along in a year. They were just playing about an hour ago, and when it's time to go back home, my Dobe whines because he wants to still play with Diesel (the AB). If I had to get any bulldog, it would be an American Bulldog due to less health issues, but some are VERY stubborn and won't tolerate any dogs of the same sex. I guess my DObe and his AB friend are the exception. THey've known each other since Vader was 3 months, so that helped, and they see each other every day. I will also say that my Dobe listens so much better than his Am. Bull buddy. BUlldogs are the definition of stubborn. Dobes are much easier to train and generally better with other dogs. Personally, I wouldn't have a Dobe and a bulldog in the same house, but I guess it also boils down to their temperaments as well.
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post #18 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-22-2010, 08:58 PM
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My husband was insistant that I looked up information on them and look at some breeders and I actually did run across a breeder that at one time bred dobermans and still keeps a female doberman with her crew. So, there is at least one that thinks the way you do.

I ultimately talked him out of it and that is when we decided to rescue a boxer instead. Still not the healthiest but we would have ultimately decided to rescue a bulldog anyway.

I just don't really understand why they seem to be bred to be more unhealthy for physical appearances/conformation. I wish they would take a step back and concentrate more on how to get acceptable physical qualities that did not risk their health.
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post #19 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-22-2010, 09:57 PM
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Yup, a boxer would be a pretty good bull breed compromise that would easily keep up to a dobe and would still have a lot of the "better" bully traits.
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post #20 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-23-2010, 12:52 PM
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Hello,

I have my English Bulldog at my feet and leaning on me as I write this note. Howie is 7.5 years old and weighs between about 73 pounds. He's not fat and for a bullie, he's fairly athletic.

Howie was raised with my boxers (I've had 5 boxers that we showed and some were registered therapy dogs). When he was a puppy, he was much more active and could go on short walks with a boxer and play at the park.

Howie's idea of fetch was watching me throw a ball and being amused how far and fast the boxer ran to retrieve the ball. Then, just as my boxer would be with a few feet of me to drop the ball, Howie would charge and steal the ball.

Since he has grown older and my last boxer died when Howie was two, he is much more sedentary. He sleeps about 20 to 22 hours a day and when he is awake, he is generally lying down. His playtime goes in spurts of ten to 15 minutes, he tires, pants and is rewarded with ice cubes from the freezer (which he loves).

My son wanted a dog he could "chill" with while he made music and thought the boxers were too bouncy and active to hang out for long periods of time while he and his friends attempted to make magic.

My son moved out for college and we kept Howie with us. I owned a few dogs before marriage and my wife owned a couple German Shepherds before we had our five boxers and I must tell you - Howie is the healthiest dog we have owned together.

His only issue is allergies. Which we try to control with diet. When needed we take him to the vet for help with this sole health concern.

Howie is far more challenging than our boxers ever were. As mentioned above, he is naturally stubborn and charm is a better motivator than firmness. One trick we learned from a kind vet when he was a young puppy is to get behind the bullie and gently tap their behind to get them to walk when they refuse to move.

Any type of aggressiveness is an absolute "no no" with a bullie. They will innately meet aggression with equal aggression. All of my boxers were decent watchdogs and some passable as guard dogs and a few times over twenty years lived up to the breed standard and protected their family from harm.

Howie is much more assertive as a guard dog than any of our boxers were and it surprises people that a rollie pollie, cuddly bullie can change in an instant into an intimidating challenger.

However Howie is terrific with strangers, children and guests in our home. My wife swears that Howie is the best, most loyal dog she has ever been around.

I adore Howie and living with him is easy. He has never torn up any item in our home, he has not been crated when left alone since he was six to eight months old. As soon as we leave the house, he sleeps on my wife's pillow until we return.

He is easy to walk, listens very well, knows a few tricks, plays gently and controls his mouth like a pro. Oh yes, teaching the English Bulldog to control his mouth is of utmost importance.

The only reason I am looking for a doberman or GSD is to share time with me on hikes and long walks.

I do not advise a male bullie with any other male dog - even if they are neutered.

I hope this helps -
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post #21 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-23-2010, 01:11 PM
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Zucker and Vader66 have given you the major health concerns that you are likely to find in an English Bulldog. But the two things that didn't get mentioned are the fact that anal gland infections and impactions are also very common and the fact that the screw tail can sometimes mean that they have difficulty defecating.

I work in a vet clinic and we have a fairly substantial clientele of English Bulldogs--all of them have skin problems, most of them have ag problems and issues with being able to poop normally and at least half of them (from an assortment of breeders) are seizure dogs--three of them have very bad seizures and must be prepared to give valium injections if their dog has cluster seizures before they can get them into their regular or an emergency vet.

And by the way--not only are very few English Bulldog puppies born naturally rather than by Caesarian section most of the are impregnated by artificial insemination as they are also generally not able to breed naturally.

My take on English Bulldogs is that they are cute puppies but unless you are expecting to win a big lottery or inherit a bunch of blue chip stock from Auntie Sue the cost of keeping an English Bulldog can be stunning. Who ever it was that said if you think the Dobes have health issues you haven't seen anything yet.

And Pleasant Guy--I think you've been incredibly lucky with your Howie--healthy English Bulldogs are the exception--certainly not the rule.
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post #22 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-23-2010, 03:06 PM
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Hi Dobebug,

My wife and I researched English Bulldog breeders for quite some time and turned down many before locating an acceptable one. Our number one concern was health. So, I agree with your note of caution about medical issues with bullies.
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post #23 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-23-2010, 09:10 PM
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I have a doberman, an English bulldog, and an American bulldog x AmStaff.

Boulder (the bulldog), has been very active since he was a puppy and as such is in much better shape than 99% of the bulldogs I've ever met. He loooooves to run, jump, play ball, etc., but he certainly cannot do it for as long as my dobe or my Staffie mix. His personality is an excellent match for the other two dogs, insofar as playing goes, and he fits in remarkably well. I keep a really close eye on his weight - the majority of bulldogs I've met are overweight - as I believe that allowing a breed that has as many respiratory issues (among other things) as bulldogs to to become obese is gross neglect on the part of the owner.

They do have a ton of potential health concerns but I enjoy them thoroughly despite that. They're certainly not for the faint of heart and they come with the possibility of staggering vet bills but their personalities and breed traits more than make up for it, in my opinion anyway.

Edit*

I should mention that I got Boulder as a ''rescue'' when a puppy blood test came back with a low white blood cell count (the breeder wanted to find him a good home with owners who knew what they were getting into). He had numerous infections as a baby (skin, bladder, etc.) but appears to have grown out of them as he matured. He snores, farts, belches, drools, requires his bum to be wiped on occasion (only when his stool is a bit runny), sheds incessantly, and smells very different from my other dogs. If you're looking for a bully and aren't stuck on an English I would definitely back up what Zucker had to say and recommend a Frenchie, an Olde English, or an American bulldog. You're still going to have a dog that sheds like mental, can arm wrestle a dump truck (at least in the case of the OEs and the Americans), thinks that they own the world, and has all the funny personality traits of the English bullies but chances are that you're going to have to deal with a lot fewer health concerns than you would with a purebred English bulldog. I have also met a number of English bulldog x boxer mixes (''Valley'' bulldogs) and quite enjoy their temperaments as well.

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post #24 of 24 (permalink) Old 11-05-2010, 09:13 PM
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I figured I would just chime in here.. I know I am a little late, but thought it funny that someone said its and odd choice for a doberman person. We have had dobermans for many years, but 2 years ago I got bit by the bulldog bug, too. We adopted a little frenchie and she does great with the boys. She is by no means an athlete, but she keeps up. I would be more then willing to talk to you about them. I absolutely love her. I think we will be a dobie/frenchie home forever!
Everyone is right, about health problems, though. She cost us over $5000 in the first month with all here surgeries that were required. and has had chronic issues since then.
That said, I think they are amazing little dogs. They are hilarious yet tough as nails. I highly suggest one, just find a good breeder.

I'll attach a picture of one of our boys playing with the baby frenchie. I think its my favorite picture!
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