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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-23-2010, 05:35 PM Thread Starter
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New Study – Extend Your Dog’s Lifespan by over 30%

New Study – Extend Your Dog’s Lifespan by over 30% : Whole Dog News



Extend Your Dog’s Lifespan by over 30%!

A study conducted at the Gerald P. Murphy Cancer Foundation and published in the December, 2009 issue of Aging Cell, has found a correlation between the age at which female rottweilers are spayed and their lifespan.The study compared long-lived female rotties (those with a lifespan of 13 or more years) with a group who lived a usual lifespan of about nine years.

“Like women, female dogs in our study had a distinct survival advantage over males,” said the lead researcher David J. Waters, associate director of Purdue University’s Center on Aging and the Life Course and a professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences. “But taking away ovaries during the first four years of life completely erased the female survival advantage. We found that female rottweilers that kept their ovaries for at least six years were four times more likely to reach exceptional longevity compared to females who had the shortest lifetime ovary exposure.”

Because death from cancer is so prevalent in rottweilers, researchers conducted a subgroup analysis of only dogs that did not die of cancer. This focused research further proved the strong association between intact ovaries and longevity.

Even in dogs that did not die of cancer, the female rotties that kept their ovaries the longest were nine times more likely to achieve exceptional longevity (13+ years).
Simply put, this study’s results indicate that the removal of a female dog’s ovaries significantly increases the risk for a major lethal disease!

Interestingly, the rottweiler research lines up with findings from another recent study of women who had undergone hysterectomies. In that study, women who lost their ovaries prior to age 50 were at greater risk of death by causes other than breast, ovarian and uterine cancer than women who kept their ovaries until age 50.

Sources:
Retaining ovaries may be a key to prolonged life in women and dogs - DVM

Exploring mechanisms of sex differences in longevi... [Aging Cell. 2009] - PubMed result

GPMCF: Healthier Respect for Ovaries






Health Problems Associated with Gonad Removal
Common sense tells us, and research proves there are a number of health benefits associated with the sex hormones (estrogen, progesterone, testosterone) produced by ovaries and testicles. These advantages vary with the age, gender and breed of each animal.

Halting production of these hormones through spaying and neutering has been found to increase the risk of certain specific diseases and conditions in dogs.

Adverse reactions of Spayed Females:
- Increased aggression in altered females. (recent study)
- Increased occurrence of urinary calculi.
- Increased difficulty passing urinary calculi.
- Increased likelihood of vulvar pyoderma (urine scald)
- Increased likelihood of urinary incontinence.
- Increased likelihood of adverse reaction to vaccinations (27-38%).
- Increased risk of Hemangiosarcoma, a highly malignant form of cancer
- Osteosarcoma (bone cancer)
- Transitional cell carcinoma (bladder cancer)
- Autoimmune thyroiditis and hypothyroidism
- Endocrine dysfunction, adrenal disease
- Notable decrease of activity/drive. (this is important to those whose animals aren’t just pets but are trained to do work or performance too)
- Increased chance of “perpetual puppy syndrome” undesirable urination.
- Inhibited social adjustment if spayed prior to complete cognitive development (usually a while AFTER sexual maturity).
- Substantial likelihood of appreciable demeanor change after spay (menopausal women know about hormone drop.. it’s not fun)
- Increased likelihood of cognitive disorders if spayed before sexual maturity.
- Increased likelihood of, or speeded progress of, degenerative osteological disorders.
- Notable decrease in muscle mass (again, not all dogs are lawn ornaments or carpet speedbumps)
- Generally live 2 (or more) years LESS than unaltered littermates in controlled studies.

Altered Males:- Increased occurrence of urinary calculi.
- Increased difficulty passing urinary calculi.
- Increased chance of urinary obstruction.
- Increased likelihood of urinary incontinence.
- Increased likelihood of adverse reaction to vaccinations (27-38%).
- Increased risk of Hemangiosarcoma, a highly malignant form of cancer
- Osteosarcoma (bone cancer)
- Transitional cell carcinoma (bladder cancer)
- Prostatic cancer
- Autoimmune thyroiditis and hypothyroidism
- Endocrine dysfunction, adrenal disease
- Notable decrease in activity/drive. (same as above in female list)
- Increased chance of “perpetual puppy syndrome” undesirable urination.
- Inhibited social adjustment if castrated prior to sexual maturity.
- Substantial likelihood of appreciable demeanor change after castration (same concept as above in female list… )
Remember, reproductive hormones affect more than just reproduction
- Increased likelihood of cognitive disorders if castrated before complete cognitive development (usually a good time AFTER sexual maturity as in females stated above).
- Notable decrease in muscle mass (yep, same as above)
- Generally live 2 (or more) years LESS than unaltered littermates in controlled studies

Sterilization decisions should be a part of an informed, holistic approach to your pet’s gealth and quality of Life and the decision to neuter or not is and should remain YOURS.

Be informed, be responsible!
Not neutering does not give you the license to breed your dog. Be responsible! Leave breeding to true breed preservationists such as Certified Natural Rearing Breeders or at the very least, breeders who keep their dogs current all health testing pertinent to their specific breed Talk with natural rearing breeders and other experienced dog owners, and consult a veterinary naturopath or a true holistic veterinarian to understand what steps you can take to insure the overall health and longevity of your pet..

If you have a puppy or even an adult dog that is intact and you are considering a spay/neuter decision, I encourage you to please research and continue to learn all you can about surgical sterilization options and the risks associated with the procedures.

In a tubal ligation, the oviducts are cut and tied off, preventing ova from getting to the uterus or coming in contact with sperm. Tubal ligation does NOT shut off hormone production, so your dog will continue to go into heat and can mate with male dogs, but no pregnancy will result.

Dogs having had a vasectomy are still able to breed with a female but will not produce sperm to get her pregnant.

If you should decide for a tubal ligation, vasectomy, spaying or casteration is best for you and your dog, make sure that your dog is mature and healthy enough to be considered balanced both physically and mentally. Generally speaking, maturity is not achieved until a dog has reached at least one year of age. Keep in mind that giant breed dogs are still developing at 2 years of age and should not be considered canidates for the loss of hormones until at least two.

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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-24-2010, 01:05 PM
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Great read. There is a woman named Juliette de Bairacli Levy who believes all animals should be left au natural. Her books are very enlightning.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-24-2010, 01:50 PM
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This is great, but I fear what will happen when the general public finds out about this. *sigh* If you think there are too many dogs in the shelter now, just wait.

It's hard enough to convince people that yes, their golden retriever should be spayed because, no, she is not breeding quality (and I know very well that people are generally not responsible enough to have an intact female and not allow her to become pregnant. They're just like, "oh, well, she was only out for a few minutes..." or "I thought it would be a good idea to go ahead and breed her now...my friend has a gorgeous male and she just happened to be over visiting, so I thought, why not?"

I understand that there are plenty of people out there that ARE responsible enough, but for every one of those people there are another 100 out there that aren't.
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-24-2010, 01:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rafensoda View Post
This is great, but I fear what will happen when the general public finds out about this. *sigh* If you think there are too many dogs in the shelter now, just wait.

It's hard enough to convince people that yes, their golden retriever should be spayed because, no, she is not breeding quality (and I know very well that people are generally not responsible enough to have an intact female and not allow her to become pregnant. They're just like, "oh, well, she was only out for a few minutes..." or "I thought it would be a good idea to go ahead and breed her now...my friend has a gorgeous male and she just happened to be over visiting, so I thought, why not?"

I understand that there are plenty of people out there that ARE responsible enough, but for every one of those people there are another 100 out there that aren't.
It's even more worrisome when folks who don't even live in this country and do not have a handle on how terrible a problem pet overpopulation is here post "studies" like this.

This particular article has been posted and re-posted a bunch of times on DT, and when the vets chime in, they point out very valid flaws in both the research and the interpretation of the research.

It's "Reader Beware" on stuff like this.




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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-24-2010, 01:58 PM
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of course. we know this. in a perfect world................................

Spay and neuter is the only realistic answer to help control the overpopulation of dogs. And possibly controlling the amount of litters/
puppies that a 'breeder' produces.

Last edited by Darkevs; 01-24-2010 at 02:02 PM.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-24-2010, 02:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rafensoda View Post
This is great, but I fear what will happen when the general public finds out about this. *sigh* If you think there are too many dogs in the shelter now, just wait.

It's hard enough to convince people that yes, their golden retriever should be spayed because, no, she is not breeding quality (and I know very well that people are generally not responsible enough to have an intact female and not allow her to become pregnant. They're just like, "oh, well, she was only out for a few minutes..." or "I thought it would be a good idea to go ahead and breed her now...my friend has a gorgeous male and she just happened to be over visiting, so I thought, why not?"

I understand that there are plenty of people out there that ARE responsible enough, but for every one of those people there are another 100 out there that aren't.
I agree with you for the most part, that for the greater good most people should spay and neuter their pets. Euthanizing millions of innocent dogs each year has got to stop. I personally feel that responsible owners should discuss spaying and neutering with their breeder and veterinarian. Veterinarians should help the owner decide on a case by case basis what is best for their pet and life situation. My own vet did this with me. He felt that because of my situation, my lifestyle and where I live, that I could handle Petey being left intact. He felt that with his on going weight issues it was healthier for him to keep his hormones. Most of the dogs in his practice are all spayed and neutered.

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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-24-2010, 02:23 PM
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Many cancers are hormonally driven--by excluding cancerous dogs from this study, are the researchers actually achieving a fair survey of the rottweiler population?
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-24-2010, 02:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luvbirds View Post
I agree with you for the most part, that for the greater good most people should spay and neuter their pets. Euthanizing millions of innocent dogs each year has got to stop. I personally feel that responsible owners should discuss spaying and neutering with their breeder and veterinarian. Veterinarians should help the owner decide on a case by case basis what is best for their pet and life situation. My own vet did this with me. He felt that because of my situation, my lifestyle and where I live, that I could handle Petey being left intact. He felt that with his on going weight issues it was healthier for him to keep his hormones. Most of the dogs in his practice are all spayed and neutered.
I had the same conversation with my vet and I am now leaning towards keeping Dillon intact. I however am one of the responsible ones.

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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-25-2010, 02:57 AM
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I would love to leave Quinn intact, as I know I would not allow him to breed anything. But he is crypto so there is too much of a risk leaving the one teste inside.
I've decided to hold off until around his 18 month bday which will be in March.

[CENTER]
Quinn will always be apart of my heart.

RIP Minnie and Oniya
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