14 week old puppy is cranky at night - Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums
Puppy Corner Everything Puppy related goes here

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-25-2009, 08:11 AM Thread Starter
Big Pup
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 40
Location: Topeka
Dogs Name: Not picked yet
Dogs Age: just born
Gallery Pics: 0
Visit JFennell's Gallery
Thanks: 71
Thanked 106 Times in 23 Posts
           
14 week old puppy is cranky at night

Hi all,
Thursday night I had my pup on the couch, I went to move him over so I could sit down and he got down right cranky with me, I quickly got him by the neck and he stopped trying to nip my hands, I went to move him again and he continued, so he ended up off the couch and I wasn't very happy with him.(no more couch visits for awhile)
Last night he got one of the kids toys and he is usually pretty good about the "leave it" command but he got down right cranky about it again. So we had a battle and I took the toy.
My question is, is this just due to him being over tired? He was super tired out and didn't get his afternoon nap. Or do I need to be treating this as a more serious problem and what would you guys recommend to correct this now?By the way he NEVER wins and all growling and carrying on just make me more determined to win the battle.

John
JFennell is offline  
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-25-2009, 08:15 AM
Alpha
 
Kpablo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,612
Location: Dallas, Texas
Dogs Name: Louie CGC & Scooby
Dogs Age: 7/26/08 & 2/07
Gallery Pics: 8
Visit Kpablo's Gallery
Thanks: 13,842
Thanked 9,309 Times in 4,121 Posts
Images: 8
                     
Send a message via AIM to Kpablo Send a message via Yahoo to Kpablo
How old is he? What do you mean by cranky?

"A man's soul can be judged by the way he treats his dog." - by Charles Doran
Facebook & Website
Kpablo is offline  
post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-25-2009, 08:34 AM Thread Starter
Big Pup
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 40
Location: Topeka
Dogs Name: Not picked yet
Dogs Age: just born
Gallery Pics: 0
Visit JFennell's Gallery
Thanks: 71
Thanked 106 Times in 23 Posts
           
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kpablo View Post
How old is he? What do you mean by cranky?
He is 14 weeks old.
By cranky just growling and going to bite hands but not following through, just kind of nipping to warn, the toy last night he growled and would not release, when I made him do it he went to the other side of the living room to nip at my youngest daughter and he wasn't successful there either. We then kenneled him up and called it a night. This morning he is back to his mischievous self and following the "leave it" command. He's a very well behaved boy, and follows commands very well.
JFennell is offline  
post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-25-2009, 08:41 AM
Alpha
 
Kpablo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,612
Location: Dallas, Texas
Dogs Name: Louie CGC & Scooby
Dogs Age: 7/26/08 & 2/07
Gallery Pics: 8
Visit Kpablo's Gallery
Thanks: 13,842
Thanked 9,309 Times in 4,121 Posts
Images: 8
                     
Send a message via AIM to Kpablo Send a message via Yahoo to Kpablo
I know my 12 month old boy doesn't listen when he's tired. He doesn't nip at me or anything like, or growl at me. So I really can't give you advice on that part. But growling not in a playful way doesn't seem normal for a 14 week pup. In face, a dog growling at his owner at any age is NOT NORMAL. MY 12 month old has NEVER growled at me unless were playing. But when he gets tired he doesn't do any commmands, and he's really obnoxious. Like a tired 3 year old trying to fight going to sleep.

"A man's soul can be judged by the way he treats his dog." - by Charles Doran
Facebook & Website

Last edited by Kpablo; 07-25-2009 at 08:54 AM.
Kpablo is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Kpablo For This Useful Post:
AllinDobes (07-25-2009), Casandra (07-25-2009)
post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-25-2009, 08:48 AM
Alpha
 
AllinDobes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 866
Location: Indiana
Dogs Name: Diablo; Icon
Dogs Age: 6 years; 5 months
Gallery Pics: 3
Visit AllinDobes's Gallery
Thanks: 655
Thanked 733 Times in 505 Posts
Images: 3
                     
that doesn't seem right either. I would recommend getting into puppy classes asap, starting simple "puppy" obedience and leadership exercises would be a very good idea.
Are you sure he's not playing with you? Or maybe he's sleeping and you have startled him and he's reacting out of fear?

I wouldn't allow him on the couch with you until this is figured out and he knows where he stands in the pack....not at the top. I'm interested to hear what others have to say as well.

Also suggest the "nothing is free moto" feed him his meals by making him work for it, and he sees it comes from YOU. Make it easy, fun and simple.
AllinDobes is offline  
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to AllinDobes For This Useful Post:
Casandra (07-25-2009), JFennell (07-25-2009), KenyaARaineCD (07-25-2009), Kpablo (07-25-2009)
post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-25-2009, 09:06 AM Thread Starter
Big Pup
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 40
Location: Topeka
Dogs Name: Not picked yet
Dogs Age: just born
Gallery Pics: 0
Visit JFennell's Gallery
Thanks: 71
Thanked 106 Times in 23 Posts
           
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABurgdorf View Post
that doesn't seem right either. I would recommend getting into puppy classes asap, starting simple "puppy" obedience and leadership exercises would be a very good idea.
Are you sure he's not playing with you? Or maybe he's sleeping and you have startled him and he's reacting out of fear?

I wouldn't allow him on the couch with you until this is figured out and he knows where he stands in the pack....not at the top. I'm interested to hear what others have to say as well.

Also suggest the "nothing is free moto" feed him his meals by making him work for it, and he sees it comes from YOU. Make it easy, fun and simple.
I'm sure he wasn't sleeping sound as I woke him before moving him. We have been going to puppy class once a week and he never eats his meals before us and he has to earn them. He knows what's required to get his food bowl down to the floor.
JFennell is offline  
post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-25-2009, 09:08 AM
Alpha
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 3,262

Gallery Pics: 0
Visit Casandra's Gallery
Thanks: 18,918
Thanked 4,992 Times in 2,153 Posts
                     
I will agree this is not normal behaviour. It could be any one of the issues others have suggested, but I think it is a dominance issue. You definitely need to get this boy into puppy socialization and obedience classes. If left untended, the issue you are discribing could get infinitely more complicated and infinitely harder to correct.

At this young stage in puppy's life, I would only use positives around the dog. No neck pulling/grabbing if possible, just issue the command and redirect the behaviour to something else. If he is nipping at you, give a firm NO! and redirect the puppy to a toy he is allowed to bite or chew on.

By using forceful grabbing or pulling, you can create a negative sensation between you and the puppy, making him/her fearful of you in future.

Good luck in finding a good training class for you and your pup

(if you have been going to puppy class, you may need extra tuition.)

Dragon Slaying Doberman's Inc. Member #102

Knowledge is a gift that can never be given back.
Casandra is offline  
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Casandra For This Useful Post:
AllinDobes (07-25-2009), JFennell (07-25-2009), Kpablo (07-25-2009), SilenceTheLambs (07-25-2009)
post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-25-2009, 09:15 AM Thread Starter
Big Pup
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 40
Location: Topeka
Dogs Name: Not picked yet
Dogs Age: just born
Gallery Pics: 0
Visit JFennell's Gallery
Thanks: 71
Thanked 106 Times in 23 Posts
           
Quote:
Originally Posted by Casandra View Post
I will agree this is not normal behaviour. It could be any one of the issues others have suggested, but I think it is a dominance issue. You definitely need to get this boy into puppy socialization and obedience classes. If left untended, the issue you are discribing could get infinitely more complicated and infinitely harder to correct.

At this young stage in puppy's life, I would only use positives around the dog. No neck pulling/grabbing if possible, just issue the command and redirect the behaviour to something else. If he is nipping at you, give a firm NO! and redirect the puppy to a toy he is allowed to bite or chew on.

By using forceful grabbing or pulling, you can create a negative sensation between you and the puppy, making him/her fearful of you in future.

Good luck in finding a good training class for you and your pup

(if you have been going to puppy class, you may need extra tuition.)
I always use positive training but when he gets like that I have no tolerance for it. I certainly don't want to sound like I'm being aggresive with him I'm just being firm and not allowing the problem to continue. Once he moves on I forgive and forget. I grab by the neck to keep him from getting my hands not to harm or scare him...And it's just light pressure , he doesn't fight me.
JFennell is offline  
post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-25-2009, 09:23 AM
Alpha
 
dragonflyz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 7,761
Location: Upstate New York
Dogs Name: Tango and Stryker
Titles: CGC, AKC pointed
Dogs Age: 7/1/08, 3/20/11
Gallery Pics: 8
Visit dragonflyz's Gallery
Thanks: 10,290
Thanked 11,037 Times in 5,016 Posts
Images: 8
                     
It sounds like your pup believes he is on the same level as you are and he doesn't trust and or respect you yet. I would be sure to follow the NILFF (nothing in life for free) Allowing your pup on your couch and bed is reinforcing him to think he is on the same level. If you look at dogs ancestors the wolves, Alpha male and Alpha female always eat first, sleep higher up and in the most comfortable spot. JMO,Good luck!

dragonflyz is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to dragonflyz For This Useful Post:
AllinDobes (07-25-2009), JFennell (07-25-2009)
post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-25-2009, 10:17 AM
Lil Pup
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 9

Gallery Pics: 0
Visit SilenceTheLambs's Gallery
Thanks: 43
Thanked 21 Times in 6 Posts
   
Quote:
Originally Posted by Casandra View Post
I will agree this is not normal behaviour. It could be any one of the issues others have suggested, but I think it is a dominance issue. You definitely need to get this boy into puppy socialization and obedience classes. If left untended, the issue you are discribing could get infinitely more complicated and infinitely harder to correct.

At this young stage in puppy's life, I would only use positives around the dog. No neck pulling/grabbing if possible, just issue the command and redirect the behaviour to something else. If he is nipping at you, give a firm NO! and redirect the puppy to a toy he is allowed to bite or chew on.

By using forceful grabbing or pulling, you can create a negative sensation between you and the puppy, making him/her fearful of you in future.

Good luck in finding a good training class for you and your pup

(if you have been going to puppy class, you may need extra tuition.)
I agree with this. Also, how old is your young daughter who you said he's tried to nip at? If she's old enough to take an active role in your puppy's training, simple things such as having her command him to "sit!" before putting down his food bowl can be beneficial to their pack relationship as well.
SilenceTheLambs is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to SilenceTheLambs For This Useful Post:
JFennell (07-25-2009)
post #11 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-25-2009, 10:56 AM Thread Starter
Big Pup
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 40
Location: Topeka
Dogs Name: Not picked yet
Dogs Age: just born
Gallery Pics: 0
Visit JFennell's Gallery
Thanks: 71
Thanked 106 Times in 23 Posts
           
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilenceTheLambs View Post
I agree with this. Also, how old is your young daughter who you said he's tried to nip at? If she's old enough to take an active role in your puppy's training, simple things such as having her command him to "sit!" before putting down his food bowl can be beneficial to their pack relationship as well.
My youngest is four and she usually feeds him supper and makes him sit and be a good boy before he gets his supper. She also does sit and down for treats with him. They have been getting along really well lately and he's even getting along with the cat now. Right now he is laying at me feet chewing on his bully and getting some affection as he's earned it, he also had to earn his bully too. I'm just confused as most of the time he's an awesome boy but he needs to know that the chain of command puts him at the bottom.
JFennell is offline  
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome