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post #1 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-20-2017, 09:48 AM Thread Starter
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Question Cannabis Oil

**Disclaimer** I will, as should anyone, be talking to a vet first before introducing any new medications, whether holistic or otherwise.

Has anyone used Cannabis/PhytoCannaBinoid Oil for their pets?

Quote:
Reasons for Use:

Pain (ex. arthritis, bone pain)
Anxiety (ex. separation, loud noise, fireworks, travel, crowds)
Inflammation
Nausea and vomiting
Loss of Appetite
Seizures, convulsions and muscle spasms
Again, if I continue to pursue it, I'll be contacting my vet first to discuss it more, but I'm quite curious if anyone else has used this (especially for anxiety) and has any comments to say as to how it worked for them/their pet.

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never tried it and do not know of anyone who has. But as it is a natural substance it might be worth trying.

what I have tried, that worked, was the bach flower remedy Mimulus. My pit Pearl had horrible anxiety attacks when it Thundered or if anyway was shooting guns in our are area. I had tried the mix, rescue remedy but it did not work, so I researched all the bach flower remedies and Mimulus most suited Pearl.

links to some good info on bach remedies for pets........ http://www.aldaronessences.com/artic...l#.WM1pUfFTE5s

https://animalwellnessmagazine.com/f...-anxious-dogs/

http://www.bachflower.com/rescue-rem...s-bach-flower/


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post #3 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-20-2017, 03:26 PM Thread Starter
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Dar, but would you recommend the Mimulus as a daily use product?

Our issue is that much of her reactivity seems to be triggered by her easily anxious skeptical nature (for instance using the thermometer ONCE, she will be a wreck for 3 hours and more likely to react later that day, all from one tiny beep).

We don't use any over the counter medications anymore as when we'd run out or miss a dose she was usually more prone to be agitated or more reactive than an average day before medication, like it didn't solve, or help the problem but just masked and sedated it IMO. We had the same thing with Melatonin (no surprise as that and the diazepam we had for special circumstances are just going to literally sedate and that's it)

Anyways, we have her well managed, but I'm always on the lookout for something that will help her feel better versus just managing her as she is.

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post #4 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-20-2017, 04:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Darkevs View Post
never tried it and do not know of anyone who has. But as it is a natural substance it might be worth trying.
Ricin is a natural substance too, but I wouldn't give it to my dog...

Just saying...
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post #5 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-20-2017, 05:39 PM
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Sam, the dosage is so 'small' so can be used daily.

Do some research for remedies that suit her 'behaviors/reactions'.

Mimulus suited Pearl so well that within a minute or so her trembling and panic would go away.

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Cannabis oil works on the GABA receptor, which is the same as alcohol, xanax, and some other less well known drugs. It's definitely effective for everything you listed (so would any of the others to a lesser degree) the big difference is that the straight oil is consistent in it's composition as compared to the plant, it's an anti inflammatory substance instead of a toxic one, and it also binds to CB receptors in the brain which adds to the anxiety and seizure reducing effects.

Will it help with anxiety in dogs? Some dogs freak out if they lose muscle tension / are unable to balance which is very distressing, however if the already anxious episodes are several hours long, most likely the dog will relax and just go to sleep or lay in their crate after they get used to it or give up.

Side effect warning: never seen oil tested but with regular cannabis some dogs that are totally normal bite people. It does alter their mental state / they can "bad trip" just like humans.

Start with a tiny dose and work up to the smallest dose that works. And it is probably safer / better for the dog than leaving it untreated or using dog paxil or something along those lines.
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Originally Posted by apollothedog View Post
Cannabis oil works on the GABA receptor, which is the same as alcohol, xanax, and some other less well known drugs. It's definitely effective for everything you listed (so would any of the others to a lesser degree) the big difference is that the straight oil is consistent in it's composition as compared to the plant, it's an anti inflammatory substance instead of a toxic one, and it also binds to CB receptors in the brain which adds to the anxiety and seizure reducing effects.

Will it help with anxiety in dogs? Some dogs freak out if they lose muscle tension / are unable to balance which is very distressing, however if the already anxious episodes are several hours long, most likely the dog will relax and just go to sleep or lay in their crate after they get used to it or give up.

Side effect warning: never seen oil tested but with regular cannabis some dogs that are totally normal bite people. It does alter their mental state / they can "bad trip" just like humans.

Start with a tiny dose and work up to the smallest dose that works. And it is probably safer / better for the dog than leaving it untreated or using dog paxil or something along those lines.
Very helpful! Thank you, from that description, it doesn't sound like it would really be helpful in the way I'm looking for, just another masking/depressing agent versus actually helping her feel truly relaxed.


This is the product I'm looking at specifically, would you say with how it's produced the effects would be the same or different? From what they say (lower portion of the page, right side), the way it's produced should, in essence, erase the "bad trip" possibility.

https://www.innovetpet.com/products/purcbd

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post #8 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-20-2017, 08:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by apollothedog View Post
Cannabis oil works on the GABA receptor, which is the same as alcohol, xanax, and some other less well known drugs. It's definitely effective for everything you listed (so would any of the others to a lesser degree) the big difference is that the straight oil is consistent in it's composition as compared to the plant, it's an anti inflammatory substance instead of a toxic one, and it also binds to CB receptors in the brain which adds to the anxiety and seizure reducing effects.

Will it help with anxiety in dogs? Some dogs freak out if they lose muscle tension / are unable to balance which is very distressing, however if the already anxious episodes are several hours long, most likely the dog will relax and just go to sleep or lay in their crate after they get used to it or give up.

Side effect warning: never seen oil tested but with regular cannabis some dogs that are totally normal bite people. It does alter their mental state / they can "bad trip" just like humans.

Start with a tiny dose and work up to the smallest dose that works. And it is probably safer / better for the dog than leaving it untreated or using dog paxil or something along those lines.
Bold mine. Sorry, but I have to speak up here. While I'm not saying I'm opposed to the use of cannabis in pets, I have to STRONGLY disagree with what you said (in bold). Paxil (generic: paroxetine) and other behavioral medications prescribed by veterinarians is FAR MORE REGULATED AND SAFE than this. Because there is no standard for safety and the use of cannabis (in oil or any other form) is NOT regulated (nor is it prescribed), there are no safety controls whatsoever. While it *can* be used and *may* be safe, you also don't have a lot of control over dosing and purity, for just a start. Behavioral medications, on the other hand, are *extremely* well regulated and *very* safe. They are also very useful for many, many dogs.

I'm copying this blog post below, as I feel like it's really well written and an important read. Just like mental illness in humans, some dogs need medication to function properly. We should not be reluctant to appropriately medicate dogs that truly need it. From: Behavior Medication: First-Line Therapy Or Last Resort? ? Dr. Jen's Dog Blog
___________________________________________
Behavior Medication: First-Line Therapy Or Last Resort?
November 14, 2016 jsummerfield8

Today, I want to shed some light on a sometimes confusing, often maligned topic in the field of dog training – namely, the use of medication to treat behavior problems.

You may have strong opinions about this already, and that’s okay. Many of my clients do. My goal with this discussion is not to convince you of anything in particular, but simply to provide information and clarify some misunderstandings that I often see. Medication may be an excellent, life-changing choice for some dogs, and not recommended at all for others. As with so many things in behavior, there is no “one size fits all.”

First, let’s take a moment to outline what we mean by “medication.” After all, this term can encompass lots of different things! I’m using it here to mean prescription drugs, although I will also touch briefly on some natural calming aids and supplements that I’ve had success with in some cases.

For our purposes today, I want to discuss two main types of behavior medications.

The first type is a daily medication, given every single day without fail regardless of what is going on. SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) like Prozac, Zoloft, and Paxil fall into this category, as well as TCAs (tricyclic antidepressants) like Clomicalm. These drugs need to be in the dog’s system at a steady state all the time in order to work – think of them as “background meds,” quietly doing their job 24 hours a day. Effects are usually fairly subtle, and it can take several weeks to see benefits so they are definitely not a quick fix! But in some dogs, these medications can be extremely helpful as part of a long-term treatment plan.

The second type is a situational medication, given only “as needed” for a specific problem. Commonly used drugs of this type would include short-acting anti-anxiety meds like Xanax, Valium, trazodone, and even tranquilizers like acepromazine on occasion. Meds like this are commonly used for problems like thunderstorm phobia or separation anxiety, and are only given at the time they are needed. The anti-anxiety effects of these drugs are usually much more dramatic and they work very quickly, but side effects (most notably drowsiness) are also more pronounced… as with everything else, there are trade-offs!

So, now that we have a basic understanding of what kinds of medication we’re talking about, let’s get into the crux of the issue: what do these meds do, exactly, and why would we want to use them?

Simply put – if all goes well, they give us a level playing field for the rest of our treatment plan.

It’s important to realize that there is a critical difference between dogs with truly abnormal behavior issues (inappropriate aggression or reactivity, separation anxiety, thunderstorm or noise phobias, etc.) and dogs who have training problems like jumping on people or not coming when called. Dogs with training issues don’t need medication – period. They need patience, consistency, and a good training plan to teach them what we want.

But for dogs with more serious behavior issues, it’s often difficult or even impossible for them to learn until we address their underlying anxiety. The brain chemistry of a dog who responds to every stranger or novel object as a terrifying threat is fundamentally different from a dog who accepts these things in stride. The same is true for a dog who panics every time his owner leaves – his heart rate soars, he salivates uncontrollably, and his system is flooded with adrenaline. These are real, physical changes that preclude any kind of learning until we can get them under control.

Can we address this anxiety through training alone? Theoretically, yes – one of the hallmarks of an effective behavior modification plan is that the dog is always kept “under threshold,” meaning that we never push the dog to the point where he becomes anxious or upset. But as a practical matter, for many dogs with issues like this, it can be very difficult to find a starting point where the dog is truly relaxed and able to learn.

This is where medication can be incredibly helpful. Does it solve the problem on its own? No, of course not. But it can certainly make life easier for everyone involved!

Used properly, a daily medication like Prozac can help your anxious or reactive dog in three ways. First, you should notice that it takes a bit “more” to cause an anxious or aggressive response than before – essentially, the dog has a longer fuse. Second, if there is a reaction, it should be less intense. And finally, it should be easier to distract or redirect the dog once the reaction has started. These are all incredibly helpful changes – for implementing a training plan successfully, and also for the dog’s quality of life.

Similarly, a situational medication like Xanax or trazodone can be life-changing for a dog with severe separation anxiety or thunderstorm phobia. These meds can help to block the automatic panic response that your dog may have when you pick up your keys to leave the house, or the first distant rumble of thunder is heard. It’s still important to have a comprehensive treatment plan in place, since we want to teach the dog to associate good things (like yummy treats or playtime) with these situations – but the medication is what keeps him calm enough to be interested in treats or play.

Even with these benefits, I know that many owners have deep-seated concerns about using behavior medication – and I definitely understand this! No one wants to put their dog at risk for dangerous side effects, or change their personality and lose the spark that makes them who they are. And so, I want to address some common questions and concerns that I often encounter during behavior appointments when the subject of drugs comes up.

Is it safe?

Fortunately, the answer to this question is overwhelmingly YES. The most commonly used behavior medications in dogs (including Prozac, Clomicalm, Xanax, and trazodone) have been in widespread use in the veterinary field since the 1990s. They are very well-tolerated by the vast majority of dogs, even in cases where they are used for many years.

As with any long-term medication, it’s always recommended to have yearly blood work done to make sure everything is normal – the same is true for humans! But, it would be extremely unusual to see any problems. I personally have never had a single patient develop any lab abnormalities or serious health issues as a result of taking behavior medications (knock on wood!), so I can vouch for the fact that this would be quite rare.

There are some chronic health conditions that may affect our choice of medication for a particular dog (such as epilepsy or liver disease), but this has more to do with how the medication might be processed by the body than any inherent danger of the drug itself.

What are some possible side effects?

It’s true that all medications can have side effects, and this is a valid concern – no one wants to “improve” behavior by drugging their dog into sleeping or staring at the wall all day. Unfortunately, this worry is based on a grain of truth since many of the older behavior drugs (such as amitriptyline, and to a lesser extent clomipramine or Clomicalm) were notorious for causing a lot of sedation and lethargy, which many owners didn’t like.

Newer, more commonly used medications like Prozac generally don’t have this effect at all – and if they do, we drop the dosage or change to a different medication. Sedation is NOT the goal. The goal is to help your dog cope with his anxiety more effectively, without changing anything else about his personality. If we see sedation or other unwanted side effects, we can always stop the medication and try something else.

I generally see very little in the way of side effects with Prozac and other SSRI’s, but the most commonly reported possibility is decreased appetite. This is normally mild, and resolves on its own within a week or two in most dogs.

Situational medications like Xanax and trazodone can certainly cause some significant sedation and uncoordinated behavior, but these are short-acting drugs that clear the system within a few hours – and because they’re only used when needed, this generally doesn’t cause any problem at all in the dog’s daily life.

Will my dog have to stay on it forever?

This is always a tough one to answer! The best, most honest response I can give is – MAYBE. For most of my patients who are on medication, our initial goal with training and management is to reach the point where things are going well, and both dog and owner are happy. When things have been going well for six months, we can try weaning off of meds to see how things go.

In many cases, the dog has learned better coping skills by this point (and the owner has become more skilled at managing things!), so the medication is no longer needed. For others, the old behavior issues begin to pop up again once the dosage is reduced – in cases like this, it’s a perfectly reasonable to option to stay on medication long-term.

Finally, I am often asked about natural alternatives to prescription medication for anxiety or aggression. There are definitely some great options out there that you may find helpful! In my experience, their effects tend to be quite subtle so these things are often not enough for a dog with a serious problem – but, they can certainly be helpful for some dogs and there’s no harm at all in giving them a try.

Zylkene – This is a natural calming aid that contains casein, a milk protein that has been shown to have a relaxing effect in dogs and cats. It comes as a capsule that can either be given whole, or opened and sprinkled in the food. This is a newer supplement, so I have less experience with it than some of the others listed, but have seen some good results. It can be used daily, or “as needed” for thunderstorms, grooming, vet visits, etc.

Composure – Another all-natural calming aid. It contains l-theanine (which is found in green tea, and increases dopamine levels in the brain to help reduce stress and anxiety), C3 colostrum complex (another type of milk protein), and thiamine or vitamin B1, which can also have a calming effect in animals. It comes as a flavored chew that most dogs will take quite readily as a treat. Several of my patients have seen very good results with Composure, so it’s definitely worth a try if you want an alternative to medication. Like Zylkene, it can either be used daily or as-needed.

Adaptil (DAP, or dog appeasing pheromone) – This is a dog-specific pheromone that can be used as a collar or a plug-in diffuser. Essentially, it’s a synthetic version of the pheromone that a mother dog produces when nursing her puppies – obviously a very comfortable, relaxed environment for the pups! Adult dogs still retain the neurologic “wiring” needed to detect this pheromone and respond to it, so it can be helpful in promoting relaxation and relieving stress.

My personal experience with DAP is that its effectiveness seems to vary quite a bit from one individual to another – some of my clients swear by it and feel strongly that it helps their dogs, while others have seen no effect at all. So give it a try if you like – both the collar and diffuser need to be replaced every 30 days, so I always suggest trying it for a month to see if it works for your dog. If it does, keep using it! If not, no harm done.

It’s always best to check with your vet before starting any kind of new supplement, but in general all of these options are extremely safe and can be ordered without a prescription. In my experience, natural supplements are often not enough for dogs with serious behavior problems, but they can certainly be a good starting point. And if your dog’s issues are fairly mild, they may work very well along with training and management.

So, where does that leave us regarding our original question?

I will share my closing thoughts on this topic, but I certainly always welcome other opinions as well – feel free to comment if you have an alternative viewpoint.

In my opinion, medication should be considered as a first-line treatment option for the vast majority of dogs with true behavior problems – including aggression, compulsive behavior issues, and any type of pathological anxiety. When we try to reserve the use of drugs as a last resort, something that we only try if the case is “really bad”, or if nothing else has helped, I believe that we do these dogs a tremendous disservice.

To me, this is similar to saying that we don’t want to use insulin in a diabetic patient unless he’s crashing with DKA, or that we don’t want to treat an infection with antibiotics until full-blown sepsis sets in – it makes no sense to withhold a basic treatment option with minimal risks and lots of potential benefits, until the situation becomes truly desperate.

Far better, if we can, to prevent this from happening in the first place with a well thought-out, comprehensive treatment plan in the beginning.
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post #9 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-21-2017, 03:34 PM
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That product contains 0% THC, so essentially it's olive oil or hemp oil. It's had all the active ingredient removed. I wouldn't buy it. There are dozens of related compounds in the plant, but generally cannabis oil (I live in a state where it's legal) is amber-red, chemically pure, and totally different from anything in the news / media / scientific research so far. I don't use or go to anywhere that sells it but I do follow the research on it, and a lot of high end places are starting to use HPLC / NMR (scientific chemical analysis like would be used in any pharmaceutical lab) to identify what % of what chemicals are present. The dosing is an issue, since there's been no tests done by age / weight / breed / nationality / tolerance etc. But starting small and building is a safe strategy.

As for the other medications, they are definitely dosed accurately and regulated, and not particularly toxic. However (Ben Goldacre: What doctors don't know about the drugs they prescribe | TED Talk | TED.com #2 is a fun speaker but you can skip to 7:45 for the real discussion and some in depth discussion specifically of psychopharmaceuticals Ben Goldacre: Battling bad science | TED Talk | TED.com) there's been several Ted talks about how pharmaceutical companies test the effectiveness of their drugs, and essentially they often run 10-30 trials which is a good practice, but only apply for publication on the best ones, either because people dropped out or the data wasn't significant, with the end result being that they publish a lot of outlier studies that can't be replicated, and when labs not financially invested in the medications do fail to replicate the studies, it's nearly impossible to publish a failed study (regardless of why it failed). Ultimately this results in unreliable data on the medication, and why people who take them often have to just go down the list until they find one that works. And I'm not skeptical of most medications, just the neurochemical ones because I've seen so many not work, then one works like magic for a few months, then the dopamine/norepinephrine/serotonin boost gets downregulated and the person is worse off than before.

That blog post is very reasonable and I do agree that the medications have value and treatment is better than no treatment. Another medicine that comes to mind is gabapentin or pregabalin. It's good for seizures and anxiety, which in turn would help with the other issues. Composure is most likely a very weak opioid, and Adaptil sounds like if it works it'd be a good solution.
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That product contains 0% THC, so essentially it's olive oil or hemp oil. It's had all the active ingredient removed. I wouldn't buy it. There are dozens of related compounds in the plant, but generally cannabis oil (I live in a state where it's legal) is amber-red, chemically pure, and totally different from anything in the news / media / scientific research so far. I don't use or go to anywhere that sells it but I do follow the research on it, and a lot of high end places are starting to use HPLC / NMR (scientific chemical analysis like would be used in any pharmaceutical lab) to identify what % of what chemicals are present. The dosing is an issue, since there's been no tests done by age / weight / breed / nationality / tolerance etc. But starting small and building is a safe strategy.

As for the other medications, they are definitely dosed accurately and regulated, and not particularly toxic. However (Ben Goldacre: What doctors don't know about the drugs they prescribe | TED Talk | TED.com #2 is a fun speaker but you can skip to 7:45 for the real discussion and some in depth discussion specifically of psychopharmaceuticals Ben Goldacre: Battling bad science | TED Talk | TED.com) there's been several Ted talks about how pharmaceutical companies test the effectiveness of their drugs, and essentially they often run 10-30 trials which is a good practice, but only apply for publication on the best ones, either because people dropped out or the data wasn't significant, with the end result being that they publish a lot of outlier studies that can't be replicated, and when labs not financially invested in the medications do fail to replicate the studies, it's nearly impossible to publish a failed study (regardless of why it failed). Ultimately this results in unreliable data on the medication, and why people who take them often have to just go down the list until they find one that works. And I'm not skeptical of most medications, just the neurochemical ones because I've seen so many not work, then one works like magic for a few months, then the dopamine/norepinephrine/serotonin boost gets downregulated and the person is worse off than before.

That blog post is very reasonable and I do agree that the medications have value and treatment is better than no treatment. Another medicine that comes to mind is gabapentin or pregabalin. It's good for seizures and anxiety, which in turn would help with the other issues. Composure is most likely a very weak opioid, and Adaptil sounds like if it works it'd be a good solution.
Thank you VERY much for clarifying, and I do not disagree with what you say about pharmaceuticals. Certainly, they have their downsides. I have also seen them be the only good option for both humans and canines who could not have quality of life without them. I really appreciate you clarifying your statement - it makes much more sense with the the additional information.

I have personally used Adaptil and seen not much of a difference (your mileage may vary). I have also used Composure (some improvement) - Sam, if you want something of that nature, I think you'll see a much more significant difference with Solliquin, which has significantly higher levels of l-Theanine. It's also a lot more expensive, and you can only get it through your vet. I don't know if you have pet insurance, but I was able to get it covered as a "prescription." Note, that when I did get it prescribed, they actually recommended double the dose listed on the bottle as a recent study has suggested that is the most effective dosing level.

Good luck.


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post #11 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-21-2017, 04:46 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks guys, really appreciate the responses. I was afraid I'd get none or just negative to the subject.

I'll definitely ask about it next time we're in Nicole! No insurance on either of these two unfortunately.

Like I said she's well managed so nothing is a rush, but I'm always on the look out for something that can actually help her feel better and not just suppress the issue like I've found with most of the medications she's tried.
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post #12 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-22-2017, 07:53 PM
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Thanks guys, really appreciate the responses. I was afraid I'd get none or just negative to the subject.

I'll definitely ask about it next time we're in Nicole! No insurance on either of these two unfortunately.

Like I said she's well managed so nothing is a rush, but I'm always on the look out for something that can actually help her feel better and not just suppress the issue like I've found with most of the medications she's tried.
If you are looking for something super easy to try, I would definitely check out Composure. It's about $12 on Amazon for a month's worth. 2 chews a day (I gave them in the morning, but if there's a particularly stressful time I would time it so it was about an hour before that, and give them about the same time every day): https://www.amazon.com/VetriScience-...ords=composure


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post #13 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-24-2017, 10:38 AM
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Thumbs up I'm using it right now

So I use hemp CBD (key part) for myself, my Doberman was just diagnosed with bone cancer and though there's no broken bones he's in a lot of pain. The pain meds he's on (gabapentin) isn't doing enough, he wasn't sleeping, he was obviously really uncomfortable all the time, he was crying...

I went to the company I order from (Highland Pharms) and ordered him a bottle of oil. Background: after MUCH research for myself I found Highland Pharms to have the most information, highest concentration of CBD, reliable reviews and medical testing to back up all of their claims about their product.

Long story short, I started him on CBD oil along with his other maintenance meds and he's sleeping, not crying and even being his normal Velcro (annoying) self again.

CBD hemp oil is legal in all 50 states because it has NO THC. You can order online, ask questions through their online form and get answers within 24 hours or sooner, and trust the product as you can see the ingredients and percentages of said ingredients in their posted (reputable) tests.

If your dog doesn't have a terminal illness the dosage would be less and they even link to an article about how to figure out the correct dosage. It's trial and error but only takes a few days.

I swear by it for myself...and now for my dogs. The stuff WORKS and has virtually no side effects (assuming you buy from a reputable company and know what's in it and the potency). It's not cheap (like the crap on Amazon etc.) but at least you KNOW what you're giving your dog. I paid $150 (free shipping) for a 25ml bottle of 1,250mg of cannibidiol. Ps. buy the human stuff, not the pet one as it's way more cost effective by weight and potency. The one I got is called MAX Plus Hemp Drops and it says the dosage is 10 drops a day, with the bottle containing 50 dosages at that rate. 10 drops is not always necessary and even if it is (in my case with a 95lb terminal dobie) that's almost 2 months worth so fairly cost effective.

Do your research of course but hemp oils, creams etc. have been proven (including an article by the Mayo Clinic as well as the CDC which I read both) to treat pain, anxiety and even shrink tumors on occasion in both humans and dogs and have very little side effects besides mild sedation. It's safer (when ordered from the right company) than pharmaceuticals. Period. Don't let the fact that it's taboo deter you.


Make up your own mind.

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post #14 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-29-2017, 06:14 AM
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Vet here, and I use it. Legal loopholes allow CBD to be sold in all 50 states. It is not technically 0% THC (I don't think any company can remove all) but its minuscule amounts that the government overlooks.

That being said, I have absolutely seen great relief in some pets -appetite stimulant (I have two renal failure cats taking some, used it with a severe IBD dog), pain management, anxiety.

Problem becomes there is little oversight so the question always becomes, are you getting what you paid for. As the previous person said, I Do not use the animal versions, I use the human versions and typically the liquid. That being said, RXVitamins is a company that does make a Hemp RX product that I have used as well, specifically for cats.


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post #15 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-29-2017, 09:02 AM Thread Starter
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Very helpful! Thank you both so much. I'll be looking into the pharmacies recommended and doing some more research, but it is definitely looking like a worthwhile option to try

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post #16 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-29-2017, 10:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MeadowCat View Post
If you are looking for something super easy to try, I would definitely check out Composure. It's about $12 on Amazon for a month's worth. 2 chews a day (I gave them in the morning, but if there's a particularly stressful time I would time it so it was about an hour before that, and give them about the same time every day): https://www.amazon.com/VetriScience-...ords=composure
Composure is under $10 for a 60 count bag on Chewy if you get autoship on it. I think I'm going to give it a try for Ilka (and maybe a cat or two, as well).


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post #17 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-16-2017, 10:10 AM Thread Starter
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UPDATE

After a series of episodes and bad days with more anxiety over the last 2 weeks I've ordered 2 bags of Composure today to trial (2 months worth at baseline dosing) and we'll see how that goes, if not well or no affect my plan is a full blood panel and talking with her vet(s) about the cannabis oil, if we go that route I'll update again with my experiences

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post #18 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-20-2017, 09:08 AM
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My youngest son recently suffered a compound fracture of the femur, after surgery to put Humpty together again, there was still a piece of bone they couldn't find, so there is a small gap that has to fill in. After doing a LOT of research on the benefits of CBD in helping heal bone fracture, we ordered some. He had been prescribed oxycodone for pain, he didn't even finish half the prescription after starting on the CBD(a good thing IMHO<G>) xrays will tell the tale of how it's healing, but we're 5 weeks out from those at this time. That being said, I won't give my kid something I won't use, so I tried it, I am sold. I didn't even realize apparently, how much anxiety? stress? whatever, I was experiencing. But a very low dose of the oil(Charlottes Web Plus, think it's 500mg CBD per bottle, or 16.6mg CBD per ml)) has made a tremendous difference in my emotional state.I mean a BIG difference! I have a dog (non Dobe) who is extremely thunder phobic, and yup, I'm going to try it on him next time we have a storm coming.

There is such a minute amount of THC in the oil that there are no psychoactive effects. None. It will not impair the ability to pass a drug screen for work or other purposes as long as you don't go overboard with dosage. My son is taking 1ml a day, sometimes as much as 2 depending on his discomfort level, I use a half ml daily. Pricey? Yes it is, but worth every penny in my opinion. So? That's been my experience, if I use it on Simon, I'll share the results!

I bought mine originally from the Hemp Farmacy in North Carolina, the girls there are extremely knowledgeable on all the products they sell, and can advise you on the best choice for you and your situation. As for sellers, I use the Charlottes Web, but there is a company in SC that gets high marks, Palmetto Harmony, and there are sites that rate the quality and purity of the oils. I just feel very comfortable with the CW product line, they grow it, produce the oil, in an inspected lab, and market it. https://www.theroc.us/ here is a site that is related to CW, but has some good info on it
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